Skip to main content

Full text of "William Carey College Catalogue for the Session 1956-1957"

See other formats


LLrAM CAREY 



CATALOGUE 
EDITION 
1956-1957 




HATTIESBURG, MISSISSIPPI 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/williamcareycoll5657unse 



CAREY COLLEGE LIBRARY 
HATTIESBURG, MiSS. 



William Carey College 



Catalogue 

for the session 

1956-57 



The 1956-57 Session Begins September 7, 1956 



FOREWORD 

Set in the heart of Dixie, committed to the per- 
petuation of Christian culture, maintaining stand- 
ard scholarship in liberal education, encouraging 
scientific method, promoting fine arts, acknow- 
ledging its debt to the world without ; and believing 
that youth, developed in body, educated in mind, 
and Christian in heart, is the jewel of civilization ; 
this college offers its privileges to the youth of 
America. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Foreword 3 

Table of Contents 4 

I. WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE — AN INTRODUCTION 

William Carey, 1761-1834 7 

History of William Carey College 8 

Accreditation 10 

Objectives of William Carey College 10 

Physical Resources 10 

Campus Activities 13 

General Regulations 15 

Summer Session 16 

II. THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

Requirements for Admission _ 19 

Admission Procedure 21 

Administration of the Curriculum 21 

Requirements for Degrees 27 

Divisions of Instruction 

Division of Economics and Business Administration 34 

Division of Education _ 43 

Division of Fine Arts 57 

Division of Languages and Literature 79 

Division of Natural Science 91 

Division of Religion and Philosophy 103 

Division of Social Science 110 

III. FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

Schedule of Expenses 121 

General Financial Regulations 121 

Scholarships and Opportunities for Self -Help 123 

Veteran's Administration 124 

IV. REGISTER 

Board of Trustees 127 

Administration ~ 127 

The Faculty 128 

Committees of the Faculty 130 

Register of Students 1954-55 131 

The 1955 Commencement 139 

Degrees Conferred 141 

Academic Calendar, 1955-56 142 



IVilliam Carey College 

AN INTRODUCTION 



"Expect great things from God; attempt great things for God." 

WILLIAM CAREY 
1761 - 1834 

When God gave William Carey to the modern world he gave 
a spiritual statesman without a peer. A survey of the biographic 
facts of Carey suggests the impossibility of exhausting the rea- 
sons why William Carey is known as the father of modern mis- 
sions. 

In a cobbler shop in Northampton, England, he developed 
a passion for world missions and led his brethren in a world con- 
quest for Christ by his world-famous sermon in which he said, 
"Expect great things from God ; attempt great things for God." 

As a missionary educator, William Carey founded Seram- 
pore College, which was the first Christian college in all of India. 
Because he was a great linguist, the British governor at Calcutta 
offered him the professorship of Oriental languages at Fort Wil- 
liam College. Here Carey spent thirty years gathering a faculty 
of linguists and preparing for his most monumental work, the 
translation of Scriptures into a multitude of languages. William 
Carey translated the Scriptures, or parts of the Scriptures, into 
thirty-four different languages. He produced six grammars 
and compiled three dictionaries and one vocabulary. 

Carey's determination was as steadfast as the purpose of 
God, yet he was outstandingly humble. He chose to be called not 
Dr. Carey, the professor at Fort William, but the cobbler. He 
was characterized by a steadfast belief in the value of the in- 
dividual and that God intended that all men be free. To that end 
he sought to give them the knowledge of God, that they in their 
choices might be right. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



History of William Carey College 

In 1906 W. I. Thames, a pioneer educator in South Missis- 
sippi, founded in the southern part of Hattiesburg "South Missis- 
sippi College." This school did a noble work until 1909, when 
fire destroyed its immense administration building with all con- 
tents, including accounts, library, class rooms, and an auditorium 
with seating capacity of 1500. 

Early in 1911 Mr. W. S. F. Tatum, a wealthy lumberman and 
Methodist layman who had acquired the property, after prayer- 
ful consideration offered this property as a gift to the Baptists. 
The gift was conditioned upon the successful operation of a 
Christian school for girls for five consecutive years, with an 
attendance of not less than one hundred students the first year. 
At that time the property consisted of two frame buildings and 
ten acres of cut-over pine land. 

A corporation was organized under the laws of the state of 
Mississippi to own and control the college. Nine trustees were 
chosen from four Baptist churches of Hattiesburg, namely First 
Church, Columbia Street, Immanuel, and Fifth Avenue Church. 
The trustees organized and elected Professor W. W. Rivers, 
President of Central College, Conway, Arkansas, to take charge 
as President. Under his leadership the opening exercises were 
held in the Old Red Circle auditorium on Hemphill Street in 
September, when he gave the new institution the name Missis- 
sippi Woman's College. In November, 1911, when the Mississippi 
Baptist State Convention held its annual meeting in Gulfport, 
the school was offered free of debt to the Convention and was 
formally accepted. Baptist ownership continues. Control is 
exercised through a board of fifteen trustees, five of whom are 
elected by the Convention each year for a period of three years. 

Dr. J. L. Johnson, Jr. was elected as the First President 
under Convention control to succeed Mr. Rivers at the end of 
the first year. He took up his work July 1, 1912, and served until 
his death February 1, 1932. During the administration of Dr. 
Johnson the following buildings were erected: Tatum Court, 
Ross Hall, Johnson Hall, the dining hall, the model home, and 
Mary Ross Hospital. It was during these years that Woman's 
College became a member of the Mississippi Association of Col- 
leges and Universities, and of the Southern Association of Col- 
leges for Women. Woman's College became a member of the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools at Jack- 
son, Mississippi, on December 3, 1926. This was the crowning 
event of Dr. Johnson's administration. 

Upon the death of Dr. Johnson, Dr. W. E. Holcomb assumed 
the presidency March 14, 1932, as the unanimous choice of the 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



board of trustees. His had been a very successful career as a 
business man and Christian worker. He was a graduate of Mis- 
sissippi College, a past president of the Mississippi Baptist State 
Convention, and a valued member of the Department of Sunday 
Schools of the State Mission Board. 

Dr. Holcomb resigned in 1940 at the close of the session 
and owing to the general situation, aggravated by the war, the 
trustees of the college suspended operation, and the plant was 
used as a housing project for the army officers of Camp Shelby. 

In 1922 the Convention voted to the college an annual income 
of $10,000 until such time as the endowment of the institution 
should reach $500,000. First efforts toward securing endow- 
ment were made in 1925, during which year a sum exceeding 
$200,000 was given for the purpose by the people of Hattiesburg, 
wealthy friends elsewhere who were interested, and the Baptist 
churches of South Mississippi. After this sum had been secured, 
the Convention in the same year gave $100,000, thereby increas- 
ing the endowment to slightly more than $300,000. 

The trustees of Mississippi Woman's College in October, 
1946, elected unanimously Dr. I. E. Rouse, at that time pastor 
of the Fifth Avenue Baptist Church, Hattiesburg, to assume 
responsibility of the college administration. Dr. Rouse took up 
his work as president and business manager November 1, 1946. 

The entire college plant was completely renovated, moder- 
nized, and largely refurnished. 

The State Baptist Convention of 1950 brought Mississippi 
Woman's College under review. New emphasis was being placed 
upon Christian education. It was noted that Mississippi Woman's 
College was at the heart of the more densely populated area of 
the state and held a most strategic location on the great Gulf 
Coast section of the South. 

After three years of survey and review the annual State 
Convention of 1953 voted a coeducational status to Mississippi 
Woman's College and authorized a new name in harmony with 
her new status. 

The trustees, in their meeting April, 1954, selected the 
name William Carey, in honor of the "Father of Modern Mis- 
sions." This name was approved by the Convention Board in 
April, 1954. Dr. I. E. Rouse resigned the presidency of William 
Carey College effective July 1, 1956. The Board of Trustees 
elected Dr. J. Ralph Noonkester president of the college on July 
28, 1956. 

ACCREDITATION 

William Carey College is approved by the State Department 
of Education as a teacher training college. Her credits are also 
approved and recommended by the University of Mississippi to 
all colleges and universities outside of Mississippi. The graduates 



10 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

in education from Carey College have the same professional 
status in Mississippi as the University graduates. Carey College 
has been surveyed and accredited by the Mississippi Accredita- 
tion Committee. 

THE OBJECTIVES OF WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

William Carey College is a liberal arts college whose aim is 
to prepare young men and women for intelligent, cultured, com- 
pentent, Christian living. 

Carey College seeks: 

1. To maintain a thoroughly Christian liberal arts college. 

2. To emphasize the cultural values of the arts and sciences. 

3. To provide basic vocational and professional training. 

4. To maintain a high level of scholarship. 

5. To develop responsibile leaders and citizens. 

6. To produce mature Christians, educate leaders for the 
denomination, and promote the practice of Christian principles. 

7. To develop strong bodies and healthy habits of living. 

8. To develop talent and recognize achievement. 

It is the purpose of the college to offer this liberal arts 
program to young men and women in an atmosphere which 
affords opportunities for the promotion of high scholarship, 
proper adjustment of personality, and development of qualities 
of leadership. William Carey College seeks to create in every 
student a sense of social obligation and of true intellectual and 
spiritual values. The entire program is built around the indi- 
vidual student; the primary aims of faculty and staff are to 
provide for every student adequate instruction, proper example, 
judicious counsel, and loving devotion. In realizing these objec- 
tives each student attains his highest total personality. 

PHYSICAL RESOURCES 

The Physical Setting 

Hattiesburg, the "Hub of South Mississippi", is the home 
of William Carey College. Hattiesburg, a city of 30,000, is most 
strategically located. Four railroads intersect here and the main 
tributaries of one of the greatest highway systems in the nation 
cross at the "hub", making William Carey College most accessi- 
ble. 

South Mississippi is a part of the great Gulf Coast country, 
the playground of the nation. The climate is most equable. Ex- 
tremes in temperature are unknown here, being neither hot in 
summer nor cold in winter. The annual average temperature is 
66.6 F. William Carey College is at the center of many points 
of interest. Within a radius of about two hours' auto drive are 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 11 

Mobile and the azalea trail; Pascagoula; Biloxi, the oldest city 
of Mississippi ; Gulf port ; Pass Christian ; Bay St. Louis ; Jackson, 
the state capital ; old Natchez ; and New Orleans, the most unique 
city of America. Here, amid a profusion of flowers, are found 
the fine old traditions and well-preserved memorials of the old 
South, intermingled with the modern progress of the new South. 

William Carey College campus is composed of forty acres of 
land inside the city limits, well situated and adapted to meet 
the needs of the college and students. Native trees, shrubs, and 
flowers have been featured in the landscaping of the campus, a 
fact observed and commented upon by many visitors each year. 

Buildings and Equipment 

TATUM COURT, the administration building, is situated 
near the center of the campus. This is the oldest of the buildings, 
which are all of the colonial pattern, constructed of steel, brick 
and concrete. In the basement are classrooms for the Home 
Economics Department — (with sewing room, model bedroom, 
dining room, and three electric kitchens). Business Education 
Department, Physical Education Department (swimming pool), 
store rooms, and heating plant. On the first floor are the 
offices, classrooms, and the auditorium, equipped with a Chick- 
ering grand piano and two-manual Pilcher organ with chimes. 
The auditorium has a seating capacity of 500. On the second 
floor are the libraries, classrooms, music, art and speech studios, 
and practice rooms. In the summer of 1947, this building was 
redecorated, with pastel shades of green, blue, wisteria and 
yellow inside, and with white trim on the outside. 

ROSS AND JOHNSON HALLS, twin dormitories for girls, 
accommodate two students to the room. Arrangement by suites 
is featured, each suite comprising two bedrooms and connecting 
bath, all with outside exposures. Private bathroom facilities are 
thereby offered each group of four students. The buildings are 
fireproof, steam heated, and well ventilated. On the first floor 
are parlors, a reception hall, and bedrooms; while the second 
floor is taken up with bedrooms. The rooms are equipped with 
new furnishings. Each girl has a bed with inner-spring mattress 
and box springs, a study desk, a ladder back chair, a closet, and 
a dresser that is shared. Venetian blinds cover the windows. 
Another attractive thing about the bedrooms is the color scheme 
carried out in the redecoration of the walls, the pastel shades 
of blue, green, yellow, and tea rose having been used. The floors 
are finished in the natural wood. 

The Boy's Dormitory follows the general pattern of the build- 
ings on the campus. The structure is brick veneer with a colon- 
aded porch. The central division is two stories with East and 
West wings and two South wings one story. The building has 
fifty rooms, two suites, and six bathrooms, with a large reception 



12 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

room. The building is very commodious with a total footage of 
16,000 square feet. Equipment has been installed on the basis 
of two boys to the room. There are individual beds with box 
springs and mattress, a double closet with sliding panel doors. 
The design includes a beautiful interior finish, mahogany flush 
doors in steel frames, pastel shaded walls, and oak floors. 

THE DINING HALL is equipped to accommodate all resi- 
dent students and faculty members. This democratic arrange- 
ment for all students to have their meals together contributes 
definitely to the promotion of "The Carey College Spirit." 

MARY ROSS HOSPITAL is an attractive fireproof brick 
building consisting of three units and represents the most modern 
ideas in college hospital construction. It contains a dispensary, 
diet kitchen, nurses' office and apartment, and reception room. 
There are two wings, one for general and the other for isolating 
purposes. Each one of these wings contains two private rooms 
and connecting bath ; also a ward, which contains four beds and 
has connecting bath. There is every facility in this hospital for 
the proper care of the minor ills of students. 

THE SCIENCE HALL is a separate building which houses 
two lecture rooms, three chemistry laboratories, biology labora- 
tory, physics laboratory and large stock room. This building has 
had a complete renovation job done on it and is adequate in every 
way to meet the needs of a liberal arts college of our size. 

PRESIDENT'S HOME is a modern brick residence of eight 
rooms located on the college campus. 

CAMPUS ACTIVITIES 
Religion and Religious Activities 

William Carey College is owned and controlled by the Mis- 
sissippi Baptist Convention, but the sectarian viewpoint is avoid- 
ed. The Baptist are first among all people who preach and prac- 
tice religious liberty. Personality is held to be sacred and soul 
competence is a primary tenet. The historical spirit is preserved 
and an open mind is encouraged. It is held that every soul is 
personally accountable unto God and must be free to make valid 
choices. That being true, all relevant facts are made available to 
the students as the basis of wise decision and sound judgment. 

The Baptists believe in the individual discovery of God and 
in religion as an inner and vital personal experience. Therefore, 
Baptists are non-credal and do not seek to impose their belief 
upon others, but they hold that with the availability of the facts 
the individual sincerely seeking the truth can and will find vital 
and positive convictions adequate for proper adjustment with 
God and man. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 13 

Baptist beliefs, as held by Roger Williams and propounded 
by Thomas Jefferson, are the basis of the American constitution 
and way of life. They who coerce politically, intellectually, or 
religiously, violate the genius of the Baptist spirit and polity. 
It is this evaluation of the individual as the prime social value 
and the inviolability of the individual soul in pursuit of truth and 
right that inform and guide Carey College in her pursuit of cul- 
ture and character for her students. This has been well termed 
"That Carey College Spirit." 

Hattiesburg is a city of churches. The students are required 
to attend church for public worship on Sunday mornings, but 
each student is given the privilege of choice as to which church 
he attends. Religion here is conceived to be the Way of Life. It 
is not a department of culture or an adjunct to life, but life at 
its total and highest best. Its end is sound moral and spiritual 
character, with personality skills developed to permit the great- 
est social contribution and achieve the highest personal enjoy- 
ment. 

THE BAPTIST STUDENT UNION serves as a co-ordinating 
agency of all the religious activities on the campus. Through the 
Executive Council, which meets weekly, students are encouraged 
to participate in the various unit organizations of the local 
churches. Its program includes morning watch, noonday prayer 
meeting, dormitory prayer service and Master's Minority. The 
local organization is affiliated with the Student Department of 
the Southern Baptist Convention, and it has a student director 
to direct the religious activities of the campus. 

THE YOUNG WOMAN'S AUXILIARY is an organization 
of the W. M. U. Its main purpose is to give the young women a 
greater vision of the needs on the mission fields and to keep be- 
fore them God's mission plan for the entire world. 

THE MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION is composed of the 
ministerial sudents on the campus, and its purpose is to promote 
Christian fellowship among the ministers. The association meets 
bi-monthly and cooperates with the B. S. U. in promoting re- 
ligious activities on the campus. 

THE MISSION BAND is composed of students who are 
mission volunteers or those who have a definite interest in mis- 
sions. It cooperates with the B. S. U. in promoting extension 
work at the local jails, hospitals, convalescent home and in the 
community. 

Student Government Association 

At William Carey College, as in any large group, individuals 
must accept certain restrictions in return for certain advantages 
accruing to the group. It is the desire of the college that every 



14 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

student realize the reasons underlying the principles which 
govern our living at Carey College. Group experience has proved 
that the observance of well considered and intelligent regulations 
is necessary. 

Therefore, Carey College assumes that each student, by the 
fact that he chooses Carey College and that Carey College chooses 
him, thereby accepts the standards of personal conduct which the 
college considers fundamental to group living. 

In addition, each student assumes personal responsibility 
for the honor of the college as a Christian institution and he 
agrees to conduct himself in accordance with her standards. 

By unanimous vote of the faculty, Student Government func- 
tions under the supervision of a faculty advisor and committee. 
It aims to develop in the students a high sense of honor and per- 
sonal responsibility. All students of the college are included in 
the membership. 

The college reserves the right to require at any time the 
withdrawal of a student whose conduct or academic work is not 
considered satisfactory by the authorities of the college. A stu- 
dent who is found to be out of harmony with the requirements 
of the college may be asked to withdraw, though no specific 
charge is made. 

Publications 

THE CRUSADER is the annual summary of college life in 
pictures, views, cartoons, and literary efforts of the students. 
In humorous and artistic style it presents a record of student life 
for the current year. 

THE COBBLER is a monthly paper which contains a record 
of all current events of interest in the life of the college. It is 
edited by a selected staff and affords a number of students with 
practical experience in journalistic work. 

THE LANCE is the official organ of the Student Govern- 
ment Association. It contains a statement of the regulations to 
be observed and gives general information regarding clubs and 
other student organizations. 

Other Student Organizations 

THE MUSIC CLUB is organized for the purpose of studying 
the lives of the great composers and of performing their works 
by club members. The club meets once a month. 

THE HOME ECONOMICS CLUB was organized in 1947. 
Its main purpose is to integrate the work of the home and family 
living program. It brings together the various class groups for 
united effort. The club group provides opportunities for play. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 15 

recreation, and social contact while the members learn and use 
parliamentary procedure. 

ORCHESIS is an organization sponsored by the Department 
of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. This group is 
especially interested in interpretative and creative rhythms. 
Membership is by invitation and try-out only. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJORS CLUB is sponsored by 
the Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. 
This organization is to advance the students in their professional 
development. 

DRAMATICS CLUB is an organization sponsored by the 
Department of Speech. This group presents several plays 
throughout the year. 

ALPHA ZETA CHAPTER of Chi Beta Phi had its beginning 
in April, 1955, with the foundation of the Carey College Science 
Club. On December 10, 1955, Alpha Zeta Chapter of Chi Beta 
Phi, national honorary scientific fraternity, was formally in- 
stalled 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

Articles to Furnish 

Dormitory rooms are equipped with single beds. Students 
will be expected to provide towels, sheets, blankets, spreads, 
pillow cases, pillow, and window curtains. 

If students wish floor coverings, such as rugs or carpet 
squares, they must furnish them. Venetian blinds for windows 
are furnished by the college. 

Each student must have personal laundry bags and all other 
articles to be laundered plainly marked with indelible ink. 

Each boarding student should furnish a knife, fork, and 
spoon, to be kept in his own room for use there. 

The college furnishes ironing boards for young women, but 
own iron must be furnished. 

Laundry 

The college has an arrangement with one of the local 
laundries to come and pick up all laundry and bring it back to 
the campus. The charge is made by the piece. Students find this 
to be very economical. This same arrangement is made for dry 
cleaning. 

Sunday at Carey College 

William Carey College is a Christian College and we expect 
all students to observe the day as one of worship and rest. On 
Sunday morning all students attend Sunday School and worship 



16 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

services in their respective churches. Quiet hour is observed 
from two o'clock to three o'clock. Students attend the evening 
services of their churches at will. 

Visitors 

Hospitality is one of the fine traditions of the Old South 
which Carey College treasures and seeks to inculcate in her stu- 
dents. Alumni and former students are always welcome. Par- 
ents and friends of students should arrange their visits, if pos- 
sible, at a weekend, or at such time as will not interfere with the 
regular duties of the student visited. Each student is expected 
to perform the duty of hostess to his or her guests and make all 
necessary arrangements for their entertainment and comfort. 

Health 

The mild and equable climate of Hattiesburg, the situation 
of the college in the midst of the native pines, on an ample 
campus, sufficiently remote to escape the smoke and dust of the 
downtown part of the city, and the sanitary appointment of 
modern buildings and equipment, all combine to render health 
conditions at Carey College all that one could desire. The food 
served in the college dining hall is prepared by expert cooks under 
the supervision of a capable dietitian. Athletics, swimming, 
archery, tennis, softball, badminton, and other games furnish 
opportunity for a well-rounded physical development. 

A competent hostess has the oversight of the girls in each 
dormitory and a registered nurse is a member of the college staff. 
The college retains the service of a competent physician, and 
medical service is at all times available for dormitory students; 
however, surgery and hospitalization requiring special nursing 
are at the charge of the student. 

SUMMER SESSION 

William Carey College operates a Summer Session in which 
a total of fourteen semester hours may be earned. Students 
graduating at the end of the Summer Session are allowed to earn 
fifteen semester hours. 

The Summer School is divided into two five-weeks terms. 
Each is a complete unit in itself. 

A separate catalogue will be furnished on request. 



The Academic Program 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 19 

I. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

General Requirements 

To be admitted to William Carey College the student must 
give evidence that he is qualified in scholarship, character and 
health to become a student at a Christian liberal arts college. 

Before admission can be granted the following must be in 
the office of the Director of Admissions: 

1. A completely filled application form 

2. A transcript of the high school credits or previous 
college work 

3. Two letters recommending the student's character 
and scholarship 

4. A certificate of sound health from the student's 
physician 

5. A small photograph of the applicant with the name 
and date on the reverse side. 

These forms should be in the hands of the Director of Ad- 
missions at least two weeks before registration. 

Admission to the Freshman Class 

1. By Certificate from Accredited High Schools : Graduates 
of all accredited high schools must present a certificate 
showing the completion of fifteen units of high school 
work. Of the fifteen units seven are prescribed : 

English 3 

Mathematics 2 

Social Science 2 

The remaining nine units may be work done in any high 
school subject for which the high school gives credit, with 
the following exception: 

Not more than four units will be accepted 
in vocational subjects such as home eco- 
nomics, non-academic commerce courses, art 
or applied music (unless accompanied by an 
equal amount of theoretical music). 

Applicants offering fifteen units but deficient in pre- 
scribed units will be admitted to freshman standing on 
condition that the deficiency shall be made up before ad- 
mission to senior standing. 

2. By Special Examination: Applicants who have not com- 
pleted fifteen units of high school work and who are over 
twenty-one years of age may be admitted by special ex- 



20 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

animation. Such an applicant should prepare and submit 
a statement concerning all previous education and train- 
ing. After successfully passing a battery of achieve- 
ment tests the student may be granted admission. 
The high school level General Educational Development 
Test may be accepted in lieu of the high school certificate. 

Admission to Advanced Standing 

1. William Carey College will admit only the transfer stu- 
dents who are in good academic standing in the school 
which they last attended. 

2. Only those courses which are consistent with the liberal 
arts curriculum of William Carey College will be trans- 
ferred. 

3. A maximum of sixty-four semester hours will be accept- 
ed from a junior college. 

4. The student must offer as many quality points as semes- 
ter hours. Quality points earned at other colleges will 
be credited to the student, but he must also earn an 
equivalent number of quality points as semester hours 
at William Carey College. 

5. A maximum of nine semester hours of credit may be al- 
lowed for correspondence study and must carry a grade 
of at least "C." Correspondence or extension credit will 
not be accepted in the department of the student's major. 

6. In the case of a student transferring with more than 
three but less than six semester hours credit in a required 
subject the head of the department concerned will sug- 
gest an advanced three hour elective to fulfill the require- 
ment. 

7. Four quarter hours transferring as 2 2/3 semester hours 
are accepted as the fulfillment of three semester hours in 
required courses. The student cannot be short a fraction 
of an hour in completing the minimum 130 hours required 
for graduation even if he has to take another course of 
larger credit than the required fraction. 

8. At least thirty semester hours of the senior work must 
be done in residence at William Carey College. A mini- 
mum of twelve semester hours must be taken in the stu- 
dent's major field. If work from an accredited institution 
is offered in the major or minor field it must be of like 
quality as that done at William Carey College, must carry 
a grade of at least "C" and must have the approval of 
the division in which the student is doing his major work. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 21 

Unclassified Students 

1. Special Students: 

(a) With the permission of the Dean a student may- 
register for one or more courses without classifica- 
tion. 

(b) A student is a special student if he enrolls for less 
than 12 semester hours of work or if he has already 
received a baccalaureate degree. Students who are 
seniors are not considered special students even 
though they are taking less than 12 semester hours 
of work. 

(c) No special student may be admitted as a candidate 
for a degree in the regular course unless he meets 
all normal requirements for admission, 

2. Studio Students: 

Local students who do not fulfill entrance requirements 
for receiving college credit may register for non-credit 
courses in applied music, art and/or speech. 

Readmission of Former Students 

A former student of William Carey College who desires re- 
admission must make application to the Director of Admissions. 
In so doing he will furnish a detailed statement of his activities 
since leaving William Carey College. 



IL ADMISSION PROCEDURE 

1. Application should be made on an official application 
blank furnished by the college. 

2. A certificate should be presented from an accredited high 
school or college. Entrance credits should be sent from 
the office of the principal or registrar promptly after ap- 
plication is made. 

3. If a prospective student is in school at the time he ap- 
plies for admission he should have a transcript sent show- 
ing not only the courses completed but the courses in pro- 
gress. If he is accepted, a supplementary transcript 
showing the grades on the courses when completed will 
be required. 



III. ADMINISTRATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

The Counseling Program 

William Carey College provides for her students a guidance 
program, that through conferences students may have the bene- 



22 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

fit of faculty experience for guidance in social adjustment and 
in the choice and mastery of academic subjects in the pursuit of 
personality development. 

1. Each student who enters the college is assigned to a 
member of the faculty who acts as his advisor until he 
chooses his major field. At this time the head of the 
division of the major field becomes the advisor. 

2. A thorough program of orientation for all new students 
is provided. 

(a) All new students are required to come to the campus 
several days previous to registration in September 
for a program of orientation and testing. 

(b) The following tests are given to all students : psycho- 
logical, vocational aptitude, reading and intelligence. 
All Freshmen must take a placement test in English. 

(c) The student is introduced to campus life, the social 
and religious organizations during this period. 

(d) During the first nine weeks' term of the session spe- 
cial classes are held in orientation for new students. 
These classes are under the direction of the Dean of 
Students, the Dean of the College and the Head of 
the Department of Education and Psychology. 

3. A continuous program of guidance is provided throughout 
the student's college course. 

(a) Results of all standardized tests are recorded on the 
official transcript. 

(b) A folder containing guidance records for each stu- 
dent is filed in the Dean's office. 

(c) Each counselor has a folder on each counselee con- 
taining : 

(1) A duplicate of all counseling forms required by 
the Dean's office. 

(2) A record of all interviews with the student other 
than those scheduled by the Dean's office. 

(3) A sheet with the names of all counselees and a 
record of the dates of all interviews. A glance 
at this reminds the counselor of any student he 
might be overlooking. 

(4) Four counseling periods are scheduled during 
the session, in addition to assistance and appro- 
val at the time of registration, as follows : soon 
after release of grades to the counselor at the 
end of the first month, end of nine weeks, end 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 23 

of first semester, end of first nine weeks of 
second semester. 

(5) A card is distributed in duplicate to the coun- 
selor for each counselee, one copy to be returned 
to the Dean's office and one retained for the 
student folder of the counselor. 

Classification of Students 

The academic work of William Carey College is organized 
into four classes : The Freshman class, the Sophomore class, the 
Junior class and the Senior class. The following constitute the 
requirements for membership in each of the classes: 

1. A Freshman is a student who has satisfied all entrance 
requirements and is pursuing an approved course of at 
least twenty-eight semester hours. 

2. A Sophomore is one who has completed thirty semester 
hours and has twenty-four quality points. 

3. A Junior is one who has completed sixty semester hours 
and has fifty quality points. 

4. A Senior is one who has completed ninety-five semester 
hours and has ninety-five quality points. 

Academic Credits and Class Load 

The academic year of William Carey College runs from June 
to June. It is divided into a ten weeks' Summer Session and two 
semesters of eighteen weeks each. The semester hour is the unit 
of credit. One semester hour is earned for each class hour per 
week or for each two hour laboratory period per week. 

The normal course load is seventeen hours each semester. 
Students with an average of 2.5 for the preceding semester will be 
permitted to carry a load of eighteen hours exclusive of activity 
points. A twelve hour load is required for full-time classifica- 
tion. 

No Freshman or Sophomore will be permitted to take 300 
or 400 courses without the permission of the Dean and the in- 
structor of the course. 

Change of Program 

1. No change of schedule, either in dropping a course sched- 
uled or adding a course not scheduled, will be permitted 
except by permission of the Dean and recommendation of 
head of the department concerned. 

2. A fee of one dollar will be charged for each change of 
schedule unless the change is requested by the college 
authorities. 



24 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

3. No student will be allowed full credit for a course that 
has had six class meetings before he enters the class. 

4. Courses dropped within the first two weeks of a semester 
will not be recorded. Courses after the first two weeks 
and before the middle of a semester are recorded as WP 
(withdrawn passing) or WF (withdrawn failing), and 
courses dropped after the first nine weeks are recorded as 
failures. Any student dropping a course at any time 
without the required approval receives an F in that 
course. 

Withdrawal 

1. A student desiring to withdraw from the college must 
obtain permission from the Dean. 

2. Refunds upon withdrawal will be made only on condition 
that this permission is granted by the Dean and according 
to the outline in the catalogue under the heading of 
"Financial Regulations." 

3. No student will be granted a report of grades or a tran- 
script of any kind until his account is settled in the busi- 
ness office. 

4. Enforced withdrawal is inflicted by the faculty and ad- 
ministration upon students who do not pass the required 
number of hours. Each student is expected to pass a 
minimum of nine semester hours of work and earn nine 
quality points each semester. Any student failing to pass 
this required number of hours during any semester is 
put on probation for the following semester and if he 
fails to pass the required number of hours the second 
semester he is automatically excluded from William 
Carey College for a period of one semester. Then he 
must apply for admission to the Director of Admissions 
if he desires reinstatement. When readmitted he re- 
sumes probationary status. 

Attendance Regulations 

1. Since credit is reckoned in terms of the hours of actual 
class attendance, it is necessary that students attend 
regularly the classes in which they are enrolled. Students 
are responsible for meeting their classes at the appointed 
hours and places. 

2. No cuts are allowed. 

3. An unexcused absence, immediately preceding or follow- 
ing a holiday will be counted as two unexcused absences. 

4. All excused absences, exclusive of those for illness, must 
be arranged for in advance. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 25 

5. All faculty members are requested to submit daily re- 
ports of all absences. 

6. The Dean of Instruction or the President of the College 
grants excuses for absences with justifiable excuse. Ex- 
cused absences are reported to instructors by the office 
of the Registrar. The College Nurse grants excuses for 
absences caused by illness for time spent in the College 
Infirmary. Day students are requested to inform the 
Dean by telephone of illness in order that the office of 
the Registrar might keep proper record of excused ab- 
sences. Excuses covering absences do not relieve the 
student of the responsibility for the work done during 
the absence. Chapel absences are to be excused in the 
same manner as absences from classes. 

7. An unexcused absence from class carries as penalty the 
deduction of six points from the nine-weeks' term daily 
average. An unexcused absence from chapel carries the 
penalty of the deduction of one quality point. 

8. Three tardies to a class within a term (nine weeks) are 
equal to one unexcused absence. 

Transcripts 

The transcripts are issued by the office of the Registrar. 

1. An official transcript is one bearing the signature of the 
Registrar and the seal of the college and is mailed di- 
rectly to whatever official may be designated. 

2. An unofficial transcript does not bear the college seal. 
When a transcript is given to the person whose credits 
are transcribed thereon, it does not bear the seal, and the 
college assumes no responsibility for its accuracy after 
it leaves the Registrar's office. 

3. One transcript is issued without charge. Each tran- 
script after the first costs one dollar. 

4. Transcripts of credits will not be issued for those whose 
accounts are in arrears. 

Examinations, Grades and Quality Points 

1. Examinations are given during the eighteenth week of 
each semester. Term tests are given during the ninth 
week of each semester. 

(a) No term tests or examinations may be held at any 
other time except that designated by the adminis- 
tration. 

(b) No student is regarded as having a right to a private 
term test or semester examination. 



26 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

(c) A student who is absent from the term test or semes- 
ter examination without valid reason approved by 
the Dean forfeits credit for the semester. 

2. Seniors will be exempt from final examinations in all the 
courses of their last semester before graduation in which 
they have maintained a grade of "C" up to two weeks 
before final examinations. Seniors instead will be given 
a comprehensive examination in the major subject. 

3. Term grades are issued to students only ; semester grades 
are issued to students and to parents. The semester 
average is obtained by counting the examination grade as 
one-third and the two term grades as one-third each. 
Grades will be reported as follows: 

Points per 
Semester Hour 

A 92-100 3 

B 86-91 2 

C 78-85 1 

D 71-77 

E 65-70 

F Below 65, Failure — 1 

A grade of E is a conditional failure and may be removed 
by making a passing grade on a special examination. The 
removal of such condition must be accomplished during 
the first three weeks of the next semester or the grade 
automatically becomes an F. A grade of E cannot be 
raised above the grade of D. 

A grade of I (Incomplete) indicates that the student has 
received permission to complete the work of a course af- 
ter the end of a semester. This work must be made up 
within the first three weeks of the student's next semes- 
ter of residence. If the work is not completed within 
the allotted time, the grade automatically becomes a fail- 
ure. Work made up within the allotted time may receive 
any final grade between A and F. 

Scholastic Honors 

1. Dean's Honor List and Freshman Honor Roll 

Those meeting the following requirements are included 
on the Dean's List (for upperclassmen) or Freshman 
Honor Roll : 

(a) The student must carry not less than four literary 
subjects during the semester on which the scholastic 
average is based. 

(b) The scholastic average must be at least 2.5. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 27 

(c) The grades for the semester on which the scholastic 
average is based must include no mark lower than 
a "C." 

2. Graduation Honors 

(a) A student who has been in residence for at least two 
years and who has earned a 2.5 quality point average 
shall be graduated "cum laude" (with honor). 

(b) A student who has been in residence for at least 
two years and who has earned a 2.7 quality point 
average shall be graduated "magna cum laude" (with 
great honor) . 

(c) A student who has been in residence four years and 
who has earned a 2.9 quality point average, with no 
grade below "B," shall be graduated "summa cum 
laude" (with highest honor). 

(d) No student may be graduated with honor who has 
been suspended, dismissed, expelled or who has re- 
ceived a demerit. 

IV. REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

William Carey College confers three degrees: the Bachelor 
of Arts, the Bachelor of Science and the Bachelor of Music. It is 
expected that the candidate for the degree will, during his first 
two years in college, pursue a course of study designed to lay a 
broad cultural background. This consists of certain prescribed 
courses listed below: 

1. Minimum Requirements for All Degrees: 

Semester 
Hours 

English 101-102, 201-202 12 

History 101-102 6 

(History 201-202 may be substituted for those not 
applying for a teacher's license.) 

Biology 101-102 6 

Physical Science (3 hours must be Math 131 or 132) 6 

Fine Arts _ 3 

Religion 6 

Speech 131 3 

Health 130 3 

Psychology 271 3 

Physical Education (activities) 4 

52 
Upper-level hours (hours in courses numbered 300 or 

above) 40 

Hours earned in senior work in residence at W^illiam 

Carey College 30 

Hours in the major earned at William Carey College 12 

Hours in the minor earned at William Carey College 6 



28 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

2. Additional Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts de- 
gree: 

Foreign Language (2 years in same language) 12 

Electives 69 

(Philosophy 331 is strongly recommended as three 

hours of electives.) 



81 

3. Additional Requirements for the Bachelor of Science 
degree : 

(This degree requires a major in one of the natural 
sciences [Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Home Eco- 
nomics or General Science], Economics and Business 
Administration, Elementary Education or Physical 
Education) 

Science or Mathematics electives 6 

Electives 7 5 



81 

4. Additional Requirements for the Bachelor of Music de- 
gree may be found on page 57. 

5. The candidate for a degree will be required to complete, 
with an average grade of "C" or above, a minimum of one 
hundred thirty semester hours of which not more than 
eight semester hours are extra curricular. 

6. Extra Curricular Credits : 

The following extra curricular hours, to a maximum of 
eight semester hours may be applied towards the one 
hundred thirty semester hours required for graduation: 

Physical Education (Required) 4 

Physical Education (Elective) 4 

Editor, The Cobbler 3 

Business Manager, The Cobbler 3 

Editor, The Crusader 3 

Business Manager, The Crusader 3 

Chorus 4 

Band 4 

Dramatics - — 4 

(Only one semester hour in each activity may be earned 
in each semester, except by the Editor and Business 
Manager of the Cobbler and The Crusader.) 

7. A comprehensive examination in the student's major 
field of study. 

Before receiving the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of 
Science degree the student must pass a comprehensive 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 29 

examination in the field of major study. This examina- 
tion is in lieu of the final examinations in the courses 
of the semester just preceding graduation. If a Senior 
is not averaging a "C" in a course, he will not be exempt 
from any examination. 

The comprehensive examination requires at least three 
hours. It is usually a written test, but a section of it may 
be given orally. 

The time of the comprehensive examination is usually 
two weeks prior to graduation. 

Those who fail a comprehensive examination may take 
a re-examination after a lapse of two months. If a stu- 
dent fails a second examination, he is not eligible for re- 
examination until he has completed another semester of 
study at William Carey College. 

Comprehensive examinations are not given to Bachelor 
of Music candidates. Candidates for the degree of Bache- 
lor of Arts with a major in music will be given a compre- 
hensive examination or a graduating recital may be al- 
lowed to fulfill this requirement. 

Majors and Minors: 

Every student by the end of the sophomore year must 
have chosen a major and a minor from the seven divisions 
of the curriculum. The following outline shows the pos- 
sible emphasis within the several divisions : 

(a) Division of Economics and Business Administration 

The major emphasis may be in Economics, Busi- 
ness Administration, Accounting, Business Edu- 
cation, Secretarial Science. 

The minor emphasis may be in Economics and 
Business Administration. 

(b) Division of Education 

The major emphasis may be in Physical Educa- 
tion, Elementary Education. 

The minor emphasis may be in Physical Educa- 
tion, Education and Psychology, Psychology. 

(c) Division of Fine Arts 

The major emphasis may be in Music Education, 
Voice, Music Theory, Clarinet, Organ, Piano 
Trumpet, Violin. 

The minor emphasis may be in Art, Music. 

(d) Division of Language and Literature 

The major emphasis may be in English, French, 
Spanish, Speech. 



30 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

The minor emphasis may be in English, French, 
Spanish, Speech. 

(e) Division of Natural Science 

The major emphasis may be in Biology, Chemis- 
try, General Science, Mathematics, Home Eco- 
nomics. 

The minor emphasis may be in Biology, Chemis- 
try, Mathematics, Home Economics. 

(f ) Division of Religion and Philosophy 

The major emphasis may be in Biblical Studies, 
Religious Education, History and Philosophy of 
Religion. 

The minor emphasis may be in Religion and 
Philosophy. 

(g) Division of Social Science 

The major emphasis may be in History, Political 
Science, Sociology, Social Science. 

The minor emphasis may be in Social Science. 

9. Requirements for Teacher Certification 
(Curricula for Teachers) 

Specific state requirements for teaching are met in the 
following curricula: 



(a) General Education for all Teachers 



Semester 
Hours 



Included in the Core Curriculum 48 

(b) Professional Education for Elementary Teachers 

Human Growth and Development (Psycho- 
logy 370) or 

Child Psychology (Psychology 371) 3 

Teacher and Community (Education 344) 3 

Teaching of Reading and Language Arts 

(Education 352) 3 

Principles and Techniques of Teaching in the 

Elementary Field (Education 340) 3 

Directed Teaching in the Elementary Field 

(Education 442) 6 

Electives 6 

Total ....24 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 31 

(c) Specialized Education for Elementary Teachers 

Major in "The Child and His World" to include : 

Music for children (Education 353) 3 

Art for children (Education 346) 3 

Literature for children (Education 445) 3 

Science for children (Education 446) 3 

Arithmetic for children (Education 351) 3 

Social Science for children including Conser- 
vation of Resources (Education 444) 3 

Electives 3 

Total 21 

(d) Professional Education for Secondary School Teach- 
ers 

Educational Psychology (Psychology 372) 3 

Human Growth and Development (Psychology 

370) or 

Adolescent Psychology (Psychology 474) 3 

Techniques and Procedures of Teaching in the 

Secondary Schools (3 hours must be in 

General Methods, Education 341) 6 

Directed Teaching in the Secondary Field 

(Education 441) 6 

Total 21 

(e) Specialized Education for Secondary School Teachers 

Business Education 

Shorthand 8 

Accounting 8 

Secretarial Procedures, including filing, office 

machines, etc 6 

Typing 6 

(or Evidence of Proficiency) 

Social Business Subjects 6 

Total 28-34 

English 

Twenty-four semester hours in English which 
may include the English and Speech require- 
ments listed under "General Education" 
(Core Curriculum), but must include study in 
English and American Literature. A maxi- 
mum of six semester hours will be accepted 
from the field of speech. 



32 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



Foreign Language 

Twelve semester hours provided that two high 
school units in the same language have been 
earned. Eighteen semester hours provided 
less than two high school units in the same 
language have been earned. 

Home Economics (Non- Vocational) 

Home Residence 

Housing 

House furnishing 

Food and nutrition 9 

Clothing and Textiles 9 

Family relationships and child development 
Home Nursing 



Total 30 

Mathematics 

Eighteen semester hours to include courses in 
algebra, trigonometry and analytics. 

Science 

Biological Science (including botany) 12 

Chemistry 12 

Physics 8 

For endorsement in a subject field, a mini- 
mum of 2 4 semester hours, with not less than 
the hours listed in the subjects to be taught. 
For general science endorsement a minimum 
of 12 semester hours in physical sciences. 
The science requirements in "General Educa- 
tion" (Core Curriculum) may be included in 
meeting the above requirements. 

Social Studies 

World History 6 

American History 6 

Political Science, Geography, Sociology or 

Economics 6 

Electives 6 

Total 24 

Speech 

Twenty-four semester hours in speech. A 
maximum of six semester hours will be ac- 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 33 

cepted from the field of English. Other 
courses to include: 

Speech Fundamentals 3 

Public Speaking 3 

Oral Interpretation 3 

Dramatics 3 

Electives 12 

Total 24 

The speech requirement In "General Educa- 
tion" (Core Curriculum) may be included in 
meeting the above requirements. 

10. Application for degree: 

Students who expect to be candidates within the next 
two semesters are asked to file applications for such 
degrees at registration in the office of the Dean. 

11. Degrees are not conferred in absentia. 



S4 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

Divisions of Instruction 

DIVISION OF ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION 

The Division of Economics and Business Administration of- 
fers courses to meet the needs of three tjrpes of students: (1) 
Those who plan to enter the business field as accountants, office 
managers, secretaries, etc., (2) Those who plan to teach business 
and (3) Those who plan to do advanced or graduate study. 

The Division offers the course in business education leading 
to a high school certificate in the teaching of business subjects. 

The curriculum of this Division consists of a comprehensive 
program of general education plus the technical vocational train- 
ing. 

OUTLINE OF A STUDENT'S WORK FOR A MAJOR 

The student majoring in Business Administration and Eco- 
nomics must meet the general requirements for the Bachelor of 
Arts or Bachelor of Science degree. 

With the major emphasis on Economics 

Required: 27 semester hours composed of the following 
courses: Economics 201-202, 307, 308, 401, 402, 405; Accounting 
221-222. 

Also, 9 semester hour from any other courses in the Division. 
Suggested: Economics 303, 309; Business Administration 213, 
409-410, Accounting 324. 

Freslrman Year 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

Accounting 221-222 6 hours 

Math 131, 132 6 hours 

Economics 201-202 6 hours 

Language or Science 6 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE Z5 

Junior Year 

Economics 307, 308 6 hours 

Economics and Business Elective 3 hours 

Language or Science 6 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Electives 6 hours 

Senior Year 

Economics 401, 402 and 405 9 hours 

Major Electives 6 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Electives 6 hours 

With the major emphasis on Business Administration 

Required: 80 semester hours composed of the following 
courses: Business Administration 110, 311, 312, 409-410; Ac- 
counting 221-222; Economics 201-202, 307. 

Also, 6 semester hours from any other courses in the Divi- 
sion, Suggested: Business Education 131, 334; Business Admin- 
istration 213, 411, 413, 414; Economics 308, 309; Accounting 324. 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 162 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Business Administration 110 _ 3 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Math 131, 132 6 hours 

Economics 201-202 6 hours 

Accounting 221-222 6 hours 

Science 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Junior Year 

Business Administration 311, 312 6 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Science 6 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Electives 6 hours 



36 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



Senior Year 

Business Administration 409-410 6 hours 

Economics 307 3 hours 

Major Electives 6 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Electives 6 hours 



With the major emphasis on Accounting 

Required: 30 semester hours composed of Accounting 221- 
222, 321-322, 324, 421, 423; Business Administration 111, 409- 
410. 

Elective: 6 additional semester hours from any other 
courses in the Division. Suggested: Economics 201-202, 307, 309; 
Business Administration 213, 311, 312, 413, 414. 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Business Administration 111 3 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

Economics 201-202 6 hours 

Accounting 221-222 6 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Math 131, 132 6 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Science 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Junior Year 

Accounting 321-322 6 hours 

Accounting 324 3 hours 

Major Electives 3 hours 

Science 6 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Electives 6 hours 

Senior Year 

Accounting 421, 423 6 hours 

Business Administration 409-410 6 hours 

Major Electives 3 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Electives 6 hours 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 37 

With the major emphasis on Business Education 

Required: 42 semester hours composed of Economics 201; 
Business Administration 110, 409-410; Business Education 131- 
132, 231 or Business Education 231, 232, 331, Business Education 
233-234, 334, 402; Accounting 221-222, 324. 

May elect 3 additional hours from any other courses in the 
Division, preferably in Secretarial Science. 

Additional Suggestions : 

If a student cannot offer evidence of proficiency in typing, 
he must complete 6 semester hours in this field. 

Education is a required minor for prospective teachers of 
business subjects. See requirements for a state professional 
license, pages 30, 31. 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

Speech 131 or Health 130 3 hours 

Business Administration 110 3 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

Accounting 221-222 6 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Economics 201 3 hours 

Speech 131 or Health 130 3 hours 

Typewriting 133 or 233, or Shorthand 131-132 or 231-232 6 hours 

Science 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Junior Year 

Science or Mathematics 6 hours 

Psychology 3 70 or 474 3 hours 

Education 341 3 hours 

Psychology 372 3 hours 

Business Education 231 or 331 3 hours 

Education 335 3 hours 

Minor 9 hours 



38 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

Senior Year 

Accounting 324 3 hours 

Business Administration 409-410 6 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Business Education 334 3 hours 

Education 441 6 hours 

Business Education 402 3 hours 

With major emphasis on Secretarial Science 

Required : 45 semester hours composed of Business Adminis- 
tration 110, 111, 409-410, 412; Business Education 131-132 or 
231-232, 233-234, 333, 334, 401 ; Accounting 221-222 ; Economics 
201. 

May elect 3 additional hours in Secretarial Science or Bus- 
iness Administration. 

Additional Suggestions: 

If the student evidences proficiency in beginning shorthand, 
he may enroll in advanced courses in that field. In this case he 
will take additional elective hours within the Division to fulfill 
the requirement of 45 semester hours. 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

Health 130 or Speech 131 3 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

*Typewriting 133-134 6 hours 

Business Administration 110 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

*May take 233-234 if proficiency is shown in elementary typewriting. 

Sophomore Year 

English 201. 202 6 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Speech 131 or Health 130 3 hours 

Business Administration 111 3 hours 

Science 6 hours 

Economics 201 3 hours 

Shorthand 131-132 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Junior Year 

Science or Mathematics 6 hours 

Business Education 231-232 6 hours 

Accounting 221-222 6 hours 

Business Education 334 3 hours 

Business Education 233-234 6 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Minor 3 hours 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 39 

Senior Year 

Business Education 333, 334 6 hours 

Business Education 401 3 hours 

Business Administration 412 3 hours 

Business Administration 409-410 6 hours 

Minor 6 hours 

Electives 6 hours 

OUTLINE OF A STUDENT'S WORK FOR A MINOR 
Required: 15 semester hours composed of Economics 201- 

202; Business Administration 213; Accounting 221-222. 

Elective : 6 semester hours to be chosen from other courses 

in the Division. 

ECONOMICS 

201-202. Principles of Economics. 

A study of the elementary principles and problems of Eco- 
nomics. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

303. Economic Geography of North America. 

A study of the economic geography of the United States, 
Canada, Mexico and Central America. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

307. Money and Banking. 

A study of monetary and banking principles and practices, 
business cycles and banking systems, problems of social policy, 
and international banking since World War II. Three hours a 
week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

308. Government and Business. 

A study of corporate organization and industrial combina- 
tions ; effect of monopoly practices on price, production and dis- 
tribution ; issues in the control of monopolies ; and the role played 
by government in American business life. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

309. Managing Personal Finances. 

A course dealing with charge accounts, installment buying, 
taxation, borrowing money, savings accounts, life insurance, 
annuity, social security, owning a home and numerous other per- 
sonal problems which affect the individual. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



40 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

401. Public Finance. 

A course in the history of public finance with an emphasis 
on federal, state and local expenditures. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

402. History of Economic Thought. 

Writings of great economists of the past and present — 
Adam Smith, John Stuart Mill, and others, showing changing 
concepts of economic theories. Prerequisite : Principles of Eco- 
nomics. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

405. Comparative Economic Systems. 

A study of the economic principles and theories of captial- 
ism, communism and the various types of socialism prevalent 
today. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

110. Introduction to Business. 

A survey of modern business. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

111. General Business Mathematics. 

A course in the fundamentals of mathematical operations 
common to business practice. Required of accounting majors. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

213. Business Communications. 

A course in writing effective business letters and reports. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

311. Marketing. 

A study of trade channels, market economics, and policies. 
Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

312. Advertising. 

A study of the principles of advertising. Three hours a 
week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 41 

409-410. Business Law. 

A course in the fundamentals of everyday law, such as con- 
tracts, negotiable instruments, property, wills, deeds, mortgages, 
and torts. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. Three hours a 
week. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

411. Personnel Management. 

A study of the employing and managing of personnel in in- 
dustry and government. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

412. Office Management. 

A study of the managerial problems with which an executive 
has to deal. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. Three Semester 
Hours. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

413. Principles of Insurance. 

A study of general principles of life and property insurance. 
Open to Juniors and Seniors only. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

414. Retail Selling. 

A study of the principles and problems of retail store man- 
agement. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. Three hours a 
week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

ACCOUNTING 

221-222. Principles of Accounting. 

A basic course in the fundamental principles of accounting. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

321-322. Intermediate Accounting. 

Intermediate principles covering partnership and corpora- 
tion accounting procedures, including consignments, kinds of 
capital stock, cash, receivables and inventories from the valua- 
tion standpoint. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

324. Income Tax Accounting. 

The accounting principles and procedures involved in Fed- 
eral and State taxes on income and profits. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



42 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

421. Cost Accounting. 

An elementary course in cost accounting. Three hours a 
week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

423. Auditing. 

A course in auditing practice and procedure. Three hours 
a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION AND SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

103. Personal Use Typewriting. 

A study of keyboard techniques and operative parts of the 
typewriter. Emphasis on personal use values: writing of busi- 
ness letters, term papers, etc. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

131-132. Shorthand-Elementary. 

An intensive course in the theory and application of Gregg 
shorthand. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

133. Typeivriting-Be ginning. 

A course in the fundamental techniques of the touch sys- 
tem of typewriting. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

184. Typewriting-Intermediate. 

A course which provides for the development of additional 
typewriting techniques. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

231-232. Shorthand-Intermediate. 

A continuation of Business Education 132. Three hours a 
week. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

233-234. Typetvriting -Advanced. 

A course designed to give the student a high degree of pro- 
ficiency in specialized business procedures, such as statistical 
tabulations, legal forms, manuscript writing, rough drafts and 
training for civil service examinations. Prerequisite : Typewrit- 
ing 133, 134 or their equivalent. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

331. Advanced Ti'anscription. 

A course designed to build and maintain dictation and tran- 
scription skills. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 43 

333. Filing. 

A study of the various filing systems — alphabetic, numeric, 
automatic, geographic and subject. Three hours a week, plus 
laboratory. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

334. Office Machines. 

A study of the operation of various office machines. Seven 
and one-half hours a week, laboratory. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

335. Materials and Methods in the Teaching of Business Sub- 
jects in High Schools. 

See Education 345. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

401. Advanced Secretarial Procedures. 

A laboratory course in which the student puts into practice 
his theoretical knowledge of secretarial duties and traits. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

402. Principles and Problems in Business Education. 

A study of high school business education: curriculum, 
guidance, grading, etc., together with a study of basic princi- 
ples. Seniors only. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



44 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

DIVISION OF EDUCATION 

The Division of Education consists of the following branch- 
es: (1) Health, Physical Education and Recreation, (2) Edu- 
cation, (3) Psychology. 

The aim of the division is to provide specialized training for 
teachers. 

OUTLINE OF A STUDENT'S WORK FOR A MAJOR 

The student majoring in this division must fulfill all of the 
requirements for a Bachelor of Science degree. 

With major emphasis on Health, Physical Education and Recrea- 
tion. 

Major in Physical Education (Required Courses). 

First Aid 430 3 semester hours 

Health Education 43 4 3 semester hours 

History and Principles of P. E. 431 3 semester hours 

Organization and Adm, of P. E. 433 3 semester hours 

Technique of Sports 232 or 234, 235 6 semester Hours 

Methods of Teaching P. E. 33 and 339 6 semester hours 

Nutrition (Home Economics 342) 3 semester hours 

Family Relationships (Home E. 347) 3 semester hours 

Kinesiology 336 3 semester hours 

Correctives 337 3 semester hours 

Anatomy (Biology 301) 4 semester hours 

P, E. Activities (4 Sem. Hrs. in Core) 5 semester hours 

(This is to include: 

Team Sports — 2 hrs. 

Swimming — 1 hr. 

Tennis — 1 hr. 

Golf — 1 hr.) _ 

Rhythms 115, 116 (women) 2 semester hours 

Professional Education Courses 15 semester hours 

Psychology 370 or 474 3 semester hours 

Psychology 372 3 semester hours 

Education 341 3 semester hours 

Education 442 6 semester hours 

Summary of Requirements : 

Core Curriculum 52 semester hours 

Physical Education 41 semester hours 

Professional Education 15 semester hours 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



45 



Freshman Year 



Team Sports 110 or 112 1 

Swimming 114 1 

Hygiene 130 3 

Biology 101 3 

English 101 3 

History 101 3 

Religion 3 



Team Sports 111 or 113 1 

Tennis 118 l 

Speech 3 

Biology 102 3 

English 102 3 

History 102 3 

Religion 3 



17 



17 



Sophomore Year 

*Folk Rhythms 115 1 

Biology 301 4 

English 201 3 

Technique of Sports 232, 234.. 3 

Psychology 271 3 

Elective 3 



17 



Golf 215 1 

*Modern Rhythms 116 1 

English 202 3 

Technique of Sports 235 3 

Education 341 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 



17 



Junior Year 



Kinesiology 336 3 

Methods of Teaching Physical 

Education 330 3 

Fine Arts 3 

Psychology 370 or 474 3 

Math 3 

Nutrition 342 3 



Correctives 337 3 

Methods of Teaching 

Physical Education 339 3 

Education 372 3 

Family Relationships 347 3 

Physical Science 3 

Elective 3 



18 



Senior Year 



History and Principles of 

Physical Education 431 3 

Organization and Adminis- 
tration of Physical 

Education 433 3 

Observation and Teaching 
in Physical Education 441.... 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 2 



First Aid and Safety 430 3 

Health Education 434 3 

Observation and Teaching 

in Physical Education 441.... 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 



18 



17 



*For Women Students. 



46 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

With major emphasis on Elementary Education 

Required: 36 semester hours composed of Education 340, 
344, 346, 351, 352, 353, 442, 444, 445, 446; Psychology 271 and 
370 or 371. 

Elective: 9 additional hours in Elementary Education. 

The required course in Elementary Education fulfills the 
requirement for a major in Elementary Education and a minor in 
Education and Psychology. 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Biology 101, 102 S hours 

Religion 6 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

Physical Science (3 hours must be Math) 6 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Education 346 3 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Education 344 3 hours 

Education or Electives 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Junior Year 

Science or Mathematics Elective 6 hours 

Education 351 3 hours 

Education 352 3 hours 

Education 340 3 hours 

Psychology 370 or 371 3 hours 

Education 3 53 3 hours 

Social Studies 8 hours 

Electives 3 hours 

Senior Year 

Education 444 3 hours 

Education 445 3 hours 

Education 446 3 hours 

Education 442 6 hours 

Education Elective 3 hours 

Electives 15 hours 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



OUTLINE OF A STUDENT'S WORK FOR A MINOR 

In Health, Physical Education and Recreation: 18 semester 

hours composed of 6 hours of activity courses and 12 hours of 
theory courses. It is recommended that the following course 
offerings be selected: Activity 110, 111 or 112, 113; 114; 118. 
215 and Theory 232, or 234, 235 ; 130. 

In Education and Psychology: 21 semester hours composed 
of Psj'Chology 271, 370, 372 and Education 341, 345, 442. 

In Fsvchology: 18 semester hours composed of Psychology 
271, 370, 371, 372, 373, 474. 

HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

The purpose of the required program in Health, Physical 
Education and Recreation is to provide instruction for the de- 
velopment of knowledge and skills in a number of wholesome 
physical activities, of a recreational nature in which a student 
can participate, not only in college but in leisure time recreation 
pursuits in later life. It is the belief of this division that such a 
program will contribute to an intelligent understanding of the 
individual students regarding personal health and hygiene in 
relation to daily living and social well-being. 

It is our purpose to provide the required training for teach- 
ers, recreation leaders, and physical therapists in the field of 
Health, Physical Education and Recreation; therefore, this col- 
lege offers a major and minor in the field of Health, Physical 
Education and Recreation. 

In addition to the required program, the college provides an 
extensive program of intramural sports of seasonal activities 
such as Softball, volley ball, touch football, basketball, tennis, 
golf, table tennis, and swimming. Here opportunity is offered 
to every student to participate in some pleasurable and whole- 
some form of recreation. 

Since the emphasis in education is being placed on the total 
personality development of each individual, students and parents 
should realize the importance of that part of education which 
com.es through participation in physical activities. 

Intercollegiate Competition : Competition is provided in foot- 
ball, basketball, track and field events and baseball. A varsity 
athlete may receive a maximum of one semester hour credit for 
each varsity sport. 

Requirement: With these purposes in mind the college re- 
quires that all young men and young women have three hours of 
active physical education a week during the Freshman and Sopho- 
more years, making a total of 4 semester hours of credit for 
graduation. All students are required to have 3 semester hours 
in Health for graduation. 



4 8 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



Excuses: No one will be excused from participation in the 
required program in Health, Physical Education and Recreation. 
Provision will be made for the physically handicapped student. 
Students who are unable to participate in any form of Physical 
Education or restricted activity will be permitted to take courses 
in theory subjects of Physical Education to make up for the 
deficiency in hours incurred by not participating in the required 
activity classes. It is suggested that courses such as Archery, 
First Aid, Recreational Leadership, Arts and Craft, and Restrict- 
ed Recreation be substituted for the required activity courses. 
Fees, $1.00. 

Uniform: The regulation uniform for women consists of 
white cotton shirt, red shorts, white socks and white tennis 
shoes. A regulation swim suit is required of all students in swim- 
ming classes. The shirt, shorts and swim suits must be purchased 
from the College Book Store. 

The regulation uniform for men consists of white tee shirts, 
red shorts, white socks and white tennis shoes. 

Transfer Students: All transfer students who do not have 
four hours credit in physical education courses and three hours 
credit in health will be required to make up this deficiency. 

Veterans will be given one hour's credit with a grade of "C" 
for each six months in service up to the maximum of twenty- 
four months. 

State Department of Education Ruling for Teachers of 
Health, Physical Education and Recreation and Elementary 
School Teachers: All full-time teachers in Health, Physical Edu- 
cation and Recreation must have twenty-four semester hours of 
college credit in this field. William Carey College requires forty- 
one semester hours for a major. 

All part-time teachers in Health, Physical Education and 
Recreation, including athletic coaches, must have twelve semester 
hours of college credit in this field. 

Elementary school teachers must have six semester hours 
of college credit in Health, Physical Education and Recreation. 

THEORY COURSES 
130. Hygiene. 

A course to provide knowledge and techniques needed for 
healthful living, including the most important phases of personal 
and community hygiene. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 
232. Technique of Sports for Women. 

This course deals with history, development, administration 
and evaluation of skill tests, proper methods of conducting 
tournaments, also the analyzing and officiating of each sport 
and the teaching of the techniques of the included sports. The 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 49 

sports included are volley ball, basketball, field hockey, speedball 
and Softball. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

234. Technique of Sports for Men. 

This course deals with history, development, administration 
and evaluation of skill tests, proper methods of conducting 
tournaments, also the analyzing and officiating of each sport and 
the teaching of the techniques of the included sports. The sports 
included are football, basketball and baseball. Three hours a 
week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

235. Technique of Sports. 

The course deals with history, development, administration 
and evaluation of skill tests, proper methods of conducting 
touranments, also the analyzing and officiating of each sport and 
the teaching of the techniques of the included sports. The sports 
included are archery, bowling, fencing, handball, deck tennis, 
paddle tennis, table tennis, and track and field events. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

330. Methods of Teaching Physical Education in Elementary Schools. 
The principles of selection and adaptation of physical educa- 
tion activities to the elementary school, discussion of the activi- 
ties, methods of instruction and supervision, curriculum making 
and practice teaching studied. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

331. Rhythmic Analysis. 

The advanced study in techniques and compositional forms ; 
the teaching of rhythms and the history of rhythms studied from 
a theoretical and practical approach with special emphasis on 
program planning and participation. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

332. Recreational Arts and Crafts. 

A course in which the different craft media will be adapted 
to use in recreation programs. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

336. Kinesiology. 

A study of the principles of body mechanics, analysis of joint 
movements and muscle action from the point of physical educa- 
tion. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

337. Correctives. 

A study will be made of physical defects of the body and their 
correction. Various methods of physical examination and thera- 
peutics of exercise will be considered. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



50 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

338. Recreational Leadership. 

A study of the organization and administration of programs 
in community recreation and practice in the organization and 
leadership of social games, community festivals and camping 
programs. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

339. Methods of Teaching Physical Education in Secondary 
Schools. 

Same as Education 345. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

430. First Aid and Safety. 

Methods of caring for injuries and applying first aid to the 
injured, together with methods of preventing injuries and acci- 
dents. Course fulfills the requirements set by the American 
Red Cross for the standard, advanced and instructor's certificate 
in First Aid (teaching methods). Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

431. History and Principles of Physical Education. 

This course considers the growth and status of physical edu- 
cation movements ; also a study of principles concerned with the 
modern philosophies of health, physical education and recreation. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

432. Athletic Injuries. 

This course is designed to give prospective coaches the basic 
fundamentals and techniques in the prevention, diagnosis, treat- 
ment and care of injuries. The student will have an opportunity 
to obtain actual experience in the operation and manipulation 
of training room and equipment. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

433. Organization and Administration of Physical Education. 
The problems and procedures in the administration of phy- 
sical education. Topics include classification of students ; organ- 
ization of program; class schedules; teaching load, selection, 
buying and care of equipment ; records ; grading ; administration 
of a gymnasium. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

434. Health Education. 

This course deals with the material and activities in school 
health and health education. The activities include personal 
health surveys, field trips, individual and group reports and 
study of community health problems; preparation and develop- 
ment of health units. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 51 

435. Tests and Measurements. 

Tests and measurements in the field of Health and Physical 
Education. Special attention is given to test construction, scoring 
and methods of using results. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours, 

ACTIVITY COURSES 

110. Team Sports for Women. 

Skill techniques and rules of Volley Ball and Basketball. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: One Semester Hour. 

111. Team Sports for Women. 

Skill techniques and rules of Field Hockey and Softball. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: One Semester Hour. 

112. Team Sports for Men. 

Skill techniques and rules of Football and Basketball. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: One Semester Hour. 

113. Team Sports for Men. 

Skill techniques and rules of Track and Field and Baseball. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: One Semester Hour. 

114. Swimming — Beginning. 

Provides instruction in safety and fundamental strokes. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit : One Semester Hour. 

115. Folk Rhythms. 

Skills and techniques in folk rhythms of the various coun- 
tries of the world. Three hours a week. 
Credit: One Semester Hour. 

116. Modern Rhythms. 

Provides skill techniques and exercises for creative and in- 
terpretative rhythms ; and elementary composition forms. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: One Semester Hour. 

117. Badminton — Beginning. 

Skill techniques and rules of Badminton. Three hours a 
week. 

Credit: One Semester Hour. 



52 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

118. Tennis — Beginning 

Basic skills and techniques developed and rules for scoring. 
Forehand drive, Backhand drive, Serve and Volley. Three hours 
a week. 

Credit: One Semester Hour. 

119. Bowling— Beginning. 

Basic skills and techniques developed and rules for scoring. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: One Semester Hour. 

211. Svdmming — Intermediate and Life Saving 

Skill and practice leading to the Senior life saving certificate 
of the American Red Cross. Three hours a week. 
Credit: One Semester Hour. 

212. Tewnis — Intermediate. 

Further instruction in the basic skills and strategy of play- 
ing singles and doubles. Three hours a week. 
Credit: One Semester Hour. 

213. Roller Skating — Beginning. 

Provides the fundamental skills and practice for beginners. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: One Semester Hour. 

214. Archery — Beginning. 

Fundamental skills and techniques and rules of scoring. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: One Semester Hour. 

215. Golf — Beginning. 

Fundamental skills and techniques used for the various clubs. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: One Semester Hour. 

216. Restricted Recreation. 

This course is provided for those students physically unable 
to enroll for strenuous activity. Three hours a week. 
Credit: One Semester Hour. 

311. Swimming — Advanced. 

Leads to the American Red Cross Water Safety Instructor's 
Certificate. Synchronized swimming and competition swimming 
are stressed through meets and pageants. Three hours a week. 
Credit: One Semester Hour. 

312. Tennis — Advanced. 

Further development of skills and strategy in competition 
play of singles and doubles. Three hours a week. 
Credit: One Semester Hour. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 53 

313. Roller Skating — Intermediate. 

Practice of fundamental skills and the development of rou- 
tines. Three Hours a week. 

Credit: One Semester Hour. 

315. Golf — Advanced. 

Further development of skills and techniques and play in 
competition. Three hours a week. 

Credit: One Semester Hour. 

316. Modern Rhythms — Advanced. 

Further development of skills and techniques and creating 
choreography. Three hours a week. 

Credit : One Semester Hour. 

EDUCATION 

340. Methods and Materials of Teaching in the Elementary 
Schools. 

A critical study of methods of teaching the various elemen- 
tary school subjects. A study of the various workbooks and 
school texts. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

341. Methods and Materials of Teaching in the Secondary 
School. 

A survey of the nature of secondary school pupils, and of the 
nature of the subject matter and a study of the laws of learning 
which determine the conduct of the recitation and the manage- 
ment of the class. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

342. History of Education. 

A study of the progress, practice and organization of educa- 
tion. Three hours a week. 

Credit : Three Semester Hours. 

343. Tests and Measurements. 

A study of standardized tests and measurements. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

344. Teacher and Community. 

A study of the role of the teacher and the school in the 
community. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



54 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

345. Methods and Materials of Teaching in Specialized Subjects. 
The study of problems related to teaching in the student's 

major subject. The course is taught by professors in the major 
department. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

346. Materials and Methods in Public School Art. 
See Art 30. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

347. Physical Education for Elementary School Teachers. 
See Physical Education 330. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

348. Audio-Visual Aids in Teaching. 

This course is designed to provide prospective teachers with 
a working knowledge of such audio-visual aids as the motion pic- 
ture, film strip projectors, lanternslide projectors, flat pictures, 
the radio and graphic materials for bulletin board and chalk- 
board. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

351. Arithmetic for Children. 

A course designed for students who expect to teach in the 
elementary schools. Special attention is given to the develop- 
ment of number concept and teaching the basic operations. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

352. Methods in Teaching Reading in the Elementary School. 
A study of basic reading problems and the techniques of 

teaching reading and of increasing reading ability. Three hours 
a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

353. Education Materials and Methods in Public School Music. 
(For Elementary Education majors). See Music Education 

813. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

354. Materials and Methods in the Teaching of Applied Music. 
See Music Education 411. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

355. Materials and Methods in Elementary Public School Music. 
(For majors in Music Education). See Music Education 

313. 

356. Materials and Methods in Teaching Junior and Senior 
High School Public School Music. 

See Music Education 314. 

Credit: Thrf»e Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 55 

357-358. Directed Teaching in Applied Mitsic, 
See Music Education 421-422. 

Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

360-361. String Instruments. 

See Music Education 321-322. 

Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

362-363. Woodwind Instruments Class. 
See Music Education 323-324. 

Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

364. Brass Instruments Class. 
See Music Education 325. 

Credit : One Semester Hour. 

365. Percussion Instruments Class. 
See Music Education 326. 

Credit: One Semester Hour. 

366-367. Choral Conducting. 

See Music Education 413-414. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

441. Directed Teaching in the Secondary School. 

A course consisting of practice teaching of the student's 
major in an approved school. Two hours a day throughout the 
semester. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

442. Directed Teaching in the Elementary School. 

A course consisting of practice teaching in the elementary- 
grades of an approved school. Two hours a day throughout the 
semester. 

Credit : Six Semester Hours. 

443. Directed Teaching in the Public School Music. 
See Music Education 423. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

444. Social Studies in Elementary School. 

A course in the materials and methods of teaching social 
studies in the elementary school. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

445. Methods and Materials in Teaching Children's Literature. 
A course including methods of teaching literature in the ele- 
mentary schools and the selection of subject matter suitable for 
children. Same as Library Science 383. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



56 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

446. Science for Children. 

A study of subject matter in the field appropriate for ele- 
mentary students and the methods of teaching science in the 
elementary school. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

271. General Psychology. 

A study of the nervous system and sense organs as they are 
related to activity, sensation and discriminative responses. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

370. Human Growth and Development. 

A study of human development and behaviour and the 
methods used by parents and teachers in their relationships with 
children. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

371. Child Psychology. 

A study of growth and learning, with emphasis placed upon 
environment and training. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

372. Educational Psychology. 

A study of the unfolding processes of mental life, the ef feces 
of heredity and environment, the nature and needs of children, 
personality defects and the application of mental hygiene. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

373. Social Psychology. 

A study of the social behavior and social consciousness of 
the individual. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

474. Adolescent Psychology. 

A study of the place of adolescents in society and of the 
many desires and emotions that result from the transformation 
from childhood to adulthood. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 57 

DIVISION OF FINE ARTS 

The Division of Fine Arts consists of two branches: (1) 
art and (2) music. 

ART 

The general purpose of the courses in art is (1) to provide 
a reasonable approach to and an appreciation of the visual arts 
in cultural living and (2) to provide a basis for specialization for 
students intending to enter the field of the visual arts as artists 
or teachers. 

No major is offered in art. 

A minor consists of 18 semester hours in the department. 

11-12. Art Structure. 

A basic course requiring no special ability or previous ex- 
perience. Planned to give the student an understanding of, and 
practice in, the elements of design in the visual arts. Emphasis 
of the course on creative thinking. Lectures devoted to explana- 
tion of the elements of design and to their practical application 
in cultured living. Laboratory periods devoted to actual use of 
design in poster colors, charcoal, textile colors, watercolor paint- 
ing, and oil painting. Required of art minors. Two hours of lec- 
ture each week and one laboratory period of two hours each week. 
Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

21-22. Art History. 

A study of the history of the visual arts from prehistoric 
times to the present. Lectures, discussions, research concerning 
fine examples of art through the ages, including an approach to 
understanding contemporary art. Required of art minors. Three 
hours a week during the year. 

Credit: Six Semester hours. 

30. Materials and Methods in Public School Art. 

Lecture and laboratory projects for the elementary grades. 
Work in poster color, colored paper and clay. Art appreciation 
for the grades. Especially for Elementary Teachers. Three hours 
a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

31-32. Creative Drawing. 

A study of fine examples of drawing from the earliest times 
to the present and actual practice in creative thinking in the 
use of charcoal, pencil, ink washes and experimental media. 
Work from nature, still-life and beginning figure drawing. Pre- 
requisite: Art 11-12. Two hours of lecture each week and one 
laboratory of two hours devoted to creative drawing. 
Credit: Six Semester Hours. 



58 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

MUSIC 

Music is treated as an organic part of the work of the college, 
and music in all its branches is regarded as having an academic 
as well as vocational and cultural value. The aims of the courses 
in Music are threefold: (1) To offer to every student an oppor- 
tunity for training and participation in this field of general cul- 
ture; (2) To give to the student, who chooses to specialize in 
performing or teaching, intensive professional training in the 
musical field of his particular interest; (3) To train for musical 
leadership in Christian Service, 

All freshmen and transfer students desiring to pursue a 
degree with a major or minor in music will submit themselves 
for an individual Placement Conference at the first enrollment 
period that they enter Carey College. This Placement Conference 
is not designed to affect the admission of the student to the music 
department, but rather is designed to establish the musical needs 
of the student. Any music student showing a deficiency in any 
area of his major or minor will be required to include additional 
courses in his area of study to remove this deficiency. 

To meet the applied music requirements for a B. A. degree 
with music as a major (concentration in applied music), or a 
B.M. degree with an instrumental or voice major, each student 
will be required to receive credit for one year of applied music 
for each year he is on the campus of the College. Students trans- 
ferring from accredited colleges with credit in applied music will 
receive full credit for this work but will be required to take a 
minimum of one year of applied music for each year they are in 
residence. 

A college student may enroll for an applied music course 
without credit. All students with either a major or a minor in 
music must pass an examination at the end of each semester in 
applied music. They are required to attend recitals, concerts, and 
lectures on music given under the auspices of the Music Depart- 
ment. They are required to participate in a choral or an instru- 
mental organization each semester they are on the campus unless 
specifically excused by the director. 

Practice Requirements 

Practice requirements are based upon the amount of credit 
to be received for the course: four semester hours — two hours 
per day ; three semester hours — one and one-half hours per day ; 
two semester hours — one hour per day. All courses in applied 
music require two lessons per week, with the exception of the 
students taking applied music without credit, in which case it 
may be one or two lessons per week. The schedule for private 
lessons and for practice hours is arranged by the teacher after 
enrollment is completed and the practice room fee has been paid. 
All practice is to be done in the private practice rooms provided 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 59 

by the music department unless excused by the Chairman of 
Fine Arts. 

Recital Requirements 

A senior in the course leading to a B.M. degree with an 
instrumental or voice major is required to give a graduation re- 
cital. 

A senior in the course leading to a B.A. degree with music 
as a major (Concentration in Applied Music) or B.M. degree with 
Music Education as a major is required to give a graduation 
recital, with or without assistance, at the discretion of the direc- 
tor. 

A junior in the course leading to a B.M. degree should give 
a recital with assistance in order to meet performance require- 
ments of B.M. degree. 

The music department sponsors bi-monthly student recitals 
in the college auditorium at an hour arranged following enroll- 
ment. Also, there will be faculty recitals, senior graduation re- 
citals, organizational recitals, community concerts, and other 
recitals of a community nature. All students enrolled in applied 
music will be required to attend these recitals. 

A student who minors in Music is required to participate in 
recitals at the discretion of his instructor. 

Piano Proficiency Examination 

This examination is designed for the music major whose 
performing medium is not piano. It is taken after 8 semester 
hours of piano study has been accumulated. Until this examina- 
tion is passed, the non-piano major cannot receive credit for more 
than 8 semester hours of piano study. 

Opportunities to hear music. The student at the College has 
ample opportunities to hear music in public performance. In 
addition to the regular Community Concert series, the music 
faculty gives recitals, and there are senior and junior recitals 
and choral programs throughout the year. 

The Music Library provides an extensive collection of the 
best books, records and scores available for music education and 
for the general music student. 

The minimum requirements for a major in Music are as 
follows : 

B.A. (Concentration in Applied Music) : Applied Music 
16 hours; Theory 23-24 hours distributed as follows: 
Music 107-108, 207-208, 407-408 and Advanced Theory 
3-4 hours; History of Music 6 hours and Advanced 
courses in Music Culture 4 hours. 
B.A (Concentration in Music Theory) : Theory 30 hours 
distributed as follows: Music 107-108, 207-208, 307-308, 



60 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

407-408, 409, 410; Piano 8 hours; History of Music 6 
hours and advanced courses in Music Culture 4 hours. 

B.M. (Instrumental Major): Applied Music 32 hours; 
Theory 24 hours distributed as follows : Music 107-108, 
207-208, 307-308, 407-408; Music History 6 hours and 
Conducting 4 hours. 

B.M. (Voice Major) : Applied Music (Voice 32 hours, 
Piano 8 hours) ; Theory 24 hours distributed as follows: 
Music 107-108, 207-208, 307-308, 407-408; Music His- 
tory 6 hours ; Conducting 4 hours. Language 18 hours. 

B.M. (Music Education Major) : (1) Theory 22-24 hours 
distributed as follows: Music 107-108, 207-208 and 6-8 
hours of advanced theory. (2) Musical Performance 42- 
44 hours, distributed as follows: Conducting 4 hours. 
Ensemble 2-4 hours, Applied Major 18 hours, Piano 8 
hours, Voice Class 4 hours. Instrumental Classes 6 hours. 
If piano is applied major, the student should elect eight 
additional hours in musical performance. These eight 
hours need not all be in one medium, however. (3) Pro- 
fessional Education 24 hours distributed as follows: 
Education 341 ; Psychology 372, Psychology 370 or Psy- 
chology 474; Observation and Student Teaching; and 
Music Education Methods and Materials. 

The minimum requirements for a minor in music are 21 
hours, distributed as follows: 

Music Theory 3 hours, Music Culture 4 hours. Applied 
Music 12 hours, Ensemble 2 hours. 

All music students are required to offer a minmum of 2 
hours ensemble credit, a maximum of 4 hours will be accepted. 

The following suggested course outlines are designed to 
assist the student in planning his course of study. It is not re- 
quired that they be followed specifically as outlined, as necessary 
changes may be made to fulfill the professional needs of the 
student. Any changes, however, must be made with the approval 
of the student's major advisor and the Chairman of Fine Arts. 

B.A. WITH MAJOR IN MUSIC 
(Concentration in Applied Music) 

Freshman Year 

English 101-102 6 hours 

Biology 101-102 6 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Theory 107-108 8 hours 

Applied Music 4 hours 

Ensemble 2 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 61 

Sophomore Year 

English 201-202 6 hours 

Language 111-112 or 121-122 6 hours 

History 101-102 6 hours 

Theory 207-208 8 hours 

Applied Music 4 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Ensemble 2 hours 

Junior Year 

Language 211-212 or 221-222 6 hours 

Religion „ 6 hours 

Academic Elective 3 hours 

Electives 3-7 hours 

Music History 6 hours 

Form & Analysis 4 hours 

Applied Music 4 hours 

Ensemble hours 

Senior Year 

Physical Science 6 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Electives 12 hours 

Music Culture 4 hours 

Applied Music 4 hours 

Advanced Theory 3-4 hours 

Ensemble hours 



(Concentration in Music Theory) 

Freshman Year 

English 101-102 6 hours 

Biology 101-102 6 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Theory 107-108 8 hours 

Piano 4 hours 

Ensemble 2 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201-202 6 hours 

Language 111-112 or 121-122 „ 6 hours 

History 101-102 6 hours 

Theory 207-208 8 hours 

Piano 4 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Ensemble 2 hours 



62 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



Junior Year 

Language 211-212 or 221-222 6 

Religion 6 

Music History - 6 

Form & Analysis 4 

Counterpoint 4 

Academic Elective 3 

Electives - 6-8 

Ensemble 

Senior Year 

Physical Science 6 hours 

Music Culture _ 4 

Orchestration 3 

Composition - 3 

Psychology 271 3 

Electives 12-16 

Ensemble 

B.M. With Instrumental Major 

Freshman Year 

English 101-102 6 hours 

Biology 101-102 6 hours 

History 101-102 6 hours 

Theory 107-108 8 hours 

Applied Music 8 

Physical Education _ 2 

Ensemble 

Sophomore Year 

English 201-202 6 

Religion _ 6 

Health 130 3 

Speech 131 3 

Theory 207-208 8 

Applied Music 8 

Physical Education 2 

Ensemble hours 

Junior Year 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Physical Science 6 hours 

Music History 6 hours 

Applied Music - 8 hours 

Counterpoint 4 hours 

Voice Class 4 hours 

Electives 3 hours 

Ensemble 2 hours 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 63 

Senior Year 

Applied Music 8 hours 

Conducting 4 hours 

Form & Analysis 4 hours 

*Music Education 411 3 hours 

*Music Education 421-422 2 hours 

Ensemble 2 hours 

Electives 12 hours 

•For Piano majors only. 

B.M. With Voice Major 

Freshman Year 

English 101-102 6 hours 

Biology 101-102 _ 6 hours 

Theory 107-108 8 hours 

Voice 8 hours 

Piano „ 4 hours 

Ensemble 2 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201-202 6 hours 

Language 111-112 or 121-122 6 hours 

Music History 6 hours 

Theory 207-208 8 hours 

Voice 8 hours 

Piano _ 4 hours 

Ensemble hours 

Junior Year 

Voice 8 hours 

Counterpoint 4 hours 

Language 211-212 or 221-222 6 hours 

History 101-102 6 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Ensemble _ hours 

Senior Year 

Voice 8 hours 

Conducting 4 hours 

Physical Science 6 hours 

Language 6 hours 

Form & Analysis 4 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Ensemble 2 hours 



64 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

B.M. in Music Education 

Freshman Year 

Theory 107-108 8 hours 

English 101-102 6 hours 

Biology 101-102 6 hours 

Piano 4 hours 

Applied Major 4 hours 

History 101-102 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Ensemble - hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201-202 6 hours 

Theory 207-208 8 hours 

Applied Major 4 hours 

Piano 4 hours 

Voice Class 317-318 4 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Physical Education « 2 hours 

Ensemble 2 hours 

Junior Year 

Music Education 313 3 hours 

Music Education 314 3 hours 

Applied Major 4 hours 

Advanced Theory 3-4 hours 

Physical Science 6 hours 

Education 341 3 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Strings 2 hours 

Percussion & Brass 2 hours 

Psychology 2 71 3 hours 

Ensemble hours 

Senior Year 

Music Education 423 6 hours 

Applied Major 6 hours 

Conducting 4 hours 

Woodwinds 2 hours 

Psychology 372 3 hours 

Psychology 370 or Psychology 474 3 hours 

Elective or Voice Class 417-418 4 hours 

Music Culture 4 hours 

Advanced Theory 3-4 hours 

Ensemble hours 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 65 

I MUSIC CULTURE 

100. Singing, Music Reading and Song Leading. 

This course is designed for the non-music major. A special 
emphasis is given to the presentation of exercises for improving 
the voice; the rudiments of music reading; and the leading of 
assembly singing or congregational singing. There are no pre- 
requisites to this course. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

101. Music in General Cidture. 

A non-technical study of musical examples designed to ac- 
quaint the student with music itself. Appreciation of musical art 
forms based upon definition, aural recognition and analysis. A 
discussion of current music events. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

301. American Music. 

English origins in the seventeenth century. America's first 
composers. National songs, Lowell Mason, Stephen Foster. Music 
of the Civil War. Folk music — its use by American composers. 
The newer developments of orchestral and choral music. Con- 
temporary composers. Illustrative recordings. Open to all stu- 
dents. Two hours a week. 

Credit : Two Semester Hours. 

302. The Opera. 

A survey of the development of the opera from its earliest 
form to the present. An analysis of operatic works from the lyric 
drama of the Greeks through the works of Wagner and Verdi to 
contemporary opera. Representative works will be studied 
through the use of recordings. Open to all students. Two hours 
a week. 

Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

303-304. Survey of Music History. 

A general survey is given of the development of music and 
the relation of this development to the social and political move- 
ments of the various periods. The topics considered include a 
study of the growth of music from the ancient systems and in- 
struments through twentieth century tendencies. Students must 
spend a minimum of an hour every week listening to records. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

401. The Symphony. 

Besides providing a listening acquaintance with the sym- 
phonies, the course explores various channels for increasing the 
understanding of the great symphonic works. Local concerts and 
major broadcasts are parallel whenever feasible. Open to music 



66 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



majors and to students from other departments. Two hours a 
week. 

Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

402. The Concerto. 

A presentation of the concerto literature from Bach to Gersh- 
win, affording a listening acquaintance with the great works in 
this form and exploring various channels for increasing the stu- 
dent's effectiveness as a listener. Open both to music majors and 
to students from other departments. Two hours a week. 

Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

403. Music in Religion. 

A liberal arts course designed to develop tolerance and un- 
derstanding by showing the unity underlying the spiritual ideals 
of the three great faiths of our country: Protestant, Catholic, 
Jewish, as expressed in the music of such composers as Bach, 
Palestrina, Franck, Bloch and Dickinson. Open to all students. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

404. Trends in Contemporary Music. 

A chronological survey, through directed listening, of the 
trends found in twentieth century music, stressing appreciative 
rather than technical aspects. Not limited to music majors. One 
hour a week. 

Credit: One Semester Hour. 

n MUSIC THEORY 
106. Fundamentals of Music. 

Introductory course in musical theory with emphasis placed 
on elements of notation, rhythm, interval relationships and 
melodic and chordal factors. Sight-singing, ear-training and 
dictation are featured. Previous training in music not required. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 
107-108. Freshman Theory. 

A course for music majors in which elements of melody, 
rhythm, harmony and form are studied in various combinations 
and applied through singing, writing, listening, analyzing, key- 
board playing and dictation. Five hours a week. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 
207-208. Sophomore Theory. 

Two, three and four-part dictation based upon fundamental 
harmonic progressions; more difficult rhythmic and melodic 
problems. Weekly drill sessions. Includes a study of chromatic 
harmony and some elementary counterpoint. Five hours a week. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 67 

307-308. Counterpoint. 

Prerequisite Music 207-208. Analysis and practice of the 
methods of modal counterpoint, followed by a similar approach to 
the counterpoint of Bach. Strict counterpoint in the five species 
with one to five voices. Also a study of the free, modern or post- 
harmonic counterpoint. Two hours a week. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

407-408. Form and Analysis. 

Prerequisite Music 207-208. A course in detailed analysis of 
compositions, designed to assist the student to a better under- 
standing of independent writing and theoretical knowledge. Har- 
monic, structural and stylistic analysis of the small and large 
homophonic and contrapuntal forms. Compositions analyzed 
include those of contrapuntal, classic and romantic periods. 
A brief study of modern harmonic idioms is presented. Two hours 
a week. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

409. Orchestration. 

Prerequisite Music 207-208. A study of methods of scoring 
works for the classic orchestra ; a survey of the basic principles 
of orchestration. Students write for the various choirs of the 
orchestra, making a study of the range, tone quality and various 
combinations of instruments. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

410. Composition. 

Prerequisite Music 207-208. Original composition in the 
simpler instrumental and vocal forms with detailed examination 
and analysis of twentieth century trends in composition. Credit 
depends on amount of work done. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three or Four Semester Hours. 

HI MUSIC EDUCATION 
311. Music Methods For the Classroom Teacher. 

A course in elementary school vocal music including song, 
theory, music appreciation, rhythmic response, creative activities 
and the use of simple instruments. Integration of music with the 
entire school program. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

313. Materials and Methods of Elementary Public School Music. 
Methods and materials for music majors. Problems related 
to singing, music reading, rhythmic response, creative activities, 
music appreciation and the schoolroom orchestra. Three hours 
a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



68 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

314. Materials and Methods of Junior and Senior High 
School Public School Music. 
A consideration of techniques and materials for general mu- 
sic, mixed chorus, glee clubs, voice class, theory, music apprecia- 
tion and program building. Important texts and current ap- 
proaches are studied and evaluated. A list of materials suitable 
for carrying on various musical activities is compiled. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

315-316. Elementary Piano Class. 

Designed especially for students vi^ithout previous v^^ork in 
piano. General keyboard facility. Sight-reading of folk tunes and 
the easier classics; playing well known melodies by ear; harmo- 
nizing melodies by ear. Playing accompaniments for childern's 
songs and for adult group singing as used in community meetings. 
This course is not accepted toward a major in piano. Two hours 
a week. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 
317-318. Elementary Voice Class. 

Group work; opportunity provided for individual attention 
and performance. Study of voice production, the principles of 
singing and song material (selected Italian, English and Ameri- 
can songs) toward performance as soloist. No previous training 
necessary. It is recommended that non-majors take this class and 
one one-half hour lesson a week, rather than two one-half hour 
lessons alone. Meets requirements for music education voice ma- 
jors. Two hours a week. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 
319-320. Elementary Organ Class. 

Private instruction in groups of four. A study of the organ 
touch and elementary registration principles. Scales and exer- 
cises for pedals and manual from Barnes. Simple hymn playing. 
Two hours a week. 

Credit : Four Semester Hours. 
321-322. String Instruments Class. 

Elementary group instruction. The study and application of 
the fundamentals of playing stringed instruments including cor- 
rect tone production, bowing, technique and care of the instru- 
ments. Materials applicable for public school purposes are criti- 
cally examined. One hour a week. 

Credit : Two Semester Hours. 

323-324. Woodivind Instruments Class. 

Elementary group instruction of a practical nature is given 
to students on the various woodwind instruments. Correct tone 
production, technique and care of woodwind instruments with 
considerable attention devoted to embouchure and fingering prob- 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 69 

lems of each instrument. Suitable materials for public school use 
are evaluated. One hour a week. 

Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

325. Brass Instruments Class. 

Practical elementary class instruction is given to students 
on the instruments of the brass family with considerable at- 
tention devoted to correct tone production, technique and care of 
brass instruments. Critical examination of materials appropriate 
for use in public schools is included. One hour a week. 
Credit: One Semester Hour. 

326. Percussion Instruments Class. 

Practical class instruction is given to students on the various 
percussion instruments. Care of the instruments. Materials ap- 
plicable for public school use are evaluated. One hour a w^eek. 

Credit: One Semester Hour. 
345-346. Italian, German, French Diction. 
See Voice 345-346 for course description. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

411. Materials and Methods of the Teaching of Piano. 

A study of teaching procedures and materials for piano in- 
struction with adaptation to various age levels including the adult 
beginner. Correct habits of study and performance, recognition 
of individual differences, development of student needs, presenta- 
tion of sight-reading, technical material, aural development, me- 
morization, pedaling, musical interpretation. Leading piano 
methods and supplementary materials are examined with applica- 
tion to individual and class lessons. Two hours weekly observation 
of Music Education 315 is required. Two hours lecture a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

413-414. Choral Conducting. 

A study of the fundamentals of conducting both choral and 
instrumental groups; the technique of the baton; conducting 
without baton ; orchestral score reading ; a study of a large select- 
ed list of various types of choral literature ; rehearsal techniques, 
song leading. Two hours a week. 

Credit : Four Semester Hours. 

415-416. Advanced Piano Class. 

Continuation of principles set forth in Elementary Piano 
Class on a more advanced level. This course is not accepted 
toward a major in piano. Two hours a week. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

417-418. Advanced Voice Class. 

Group work; continued study of principles of singing and 
advanced solo repertoire — German, French, English Art Songs; 



70 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

Oratorio and operatic arias ; contemporary art songs. Required of 
voice majors. Prerequisite: preparation satisfactory to the in- 
structor. Two hours a week. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 
419-420. Advanced Organ Class. 

Continuation of Music Education 319-320. Private instruc- 
tion in groups of three. Materials are selected according to the 
needs of the student. Hymn playing. Two hours a week. 

Credit : Four Semester Hours. 
421-422. Directed Teaching of Piano. 

This course is designed to give the student supervised ex- 
perience in teaching beginning and intermediate piano students. 
Prerequisite: Music Education 411. 

Credit : Two Semester Hours. 

423. Directed Teaching in Public School MiLsic. 

Practice teaching under supervision in a public school sys- 
tem supplemented by conference and discussion in the college 
classroom. Students electing this course are expected to arrange 
with the instructor for their assignment and to meet their teach- 
ing assignments regularly on all days within the limits of the 
college semester when the schools are in session. Students tak- 
ing Music Education 421-422 may take this course for four hours. 
Credit : Six Semester Hours. 

IV APPLIED MUSIC 

Piano 

131-132. Freshman Piano. 

Major and minor in comfortable tempo. Arpeggios. Ma- 
terials selected from Piano 133-134. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

133-134. Freshman Piano. 

Major and minor scales in comfortable tempo. Arpeggios, 
dominant sevenths, diminished sevenths. Czerney. Bach, Two- 
part Inventions. Pieces of difficulty of Mozart and Haydn So- 
natas and Beethoven, Op. 49. Mendelssohn, Songs Without 
Words. For B.M. candidates only. 

Credit : Eight Semester Hours. 

231-232. Sophomore Piano. 

Major and minor scales, increased tempo. Arpeggios, domi- 
nant sevenths, diminished sevenths. Materials selected from 
Piano 233-234. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

233-234. Sophomore Piano. 

Major and minor scales, increased tempo. Arpeggios, domi- 
nant sevenths, diminished sevenths, thirds and sixths. Selections 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 71 

comparable in difficulty to Beethoven Sonatas, and easier pieces 
by Chopin, Schumann and modern composers. For B.M. candi- 
dates only. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 

315-316. Elementary Piano Class. 

See Music Education 315-316 for course description. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

331-332. Junior Piano. 

Continuation of study of previous years vv^ith materials 
selected from Piano 333-334 and pieces of medium difficulty 
selected from romantic and modern schools. 
Credit : Four Semester Hours. ' 

333-334. Junior Piano. 

Continued study of scales as outlined in 233-234. Selection 
of materials from pieces comparable in difficulty to Bach Suites 
and Well-Tempered Clavichord, Beethoven Sonatas and selected 
compositions of Chopin, Schumann, Brahms, Liszt and Debussy. 
A concerto selected from standard piano literature. For B.M. 
candidates only. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 

415-416. Advanced Piano Class. 

See Music Education 415-416 for course description. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

431-432. Senior Piano. 

Continued study of scales outlined in 233-234. Selection of 
materials from 435-436. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

433-434. Senior Piano. 

Continued study of scales. Materials selected from 435-436. 
For Music Education candidates only. 
Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

435-436. Senior Piano. 

Continued study of scales as outlined in 233-234. More dif- 
ficult pieces by Chopin, Liszt, Schumann, Brahms, Rachmaninoff. 
Selected compositions from modern schools. A concerto selected 
from standard piano literature. For B.M. candidates only. 
Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 

Voice 

141-142. Freshman Voice. • , 

Materials selected from Voice 143-144. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 



72 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

143-144. Freshman Voice. 

Tone production, simple classics in English and Italian, easy 
arias from oratorios. For B.M. candidates only. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 
241-242. Sophomore Voice. 

Further development of the voice through exercises. Songs 
selected from Voice 243-244. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 
243-244. Sophomore Voice. 

Further development of the voice through exercises. Addi- 
tional Italian songs and oratorio arias, Schubert, Schumann, Jen- 
sen lieder. For B.M. candidates only. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 

317-318. Elementary Voice Class. 

See Music Education 317-318 for course description. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 
341-342. Junior Voice. 

Continued study in advanced technique. Songs selected from 
Voice 343-344. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 
343-344. Junior Voice. 

Continued study in advanced technique. More difficult songs 
from the classic, romantic and modern literature, including H. 
Wolf, Brahms, R. Strauss, Hahn, Faure, Debussy. For B.M. 
candidates only. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 
345-346. Italian, German, French Diction. 

The study of Italian, German, French and English as applied 
to singing and speaking. Practice in use of the phonetics of these 
languages in standard song repertoire. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

417-418. Advanced Voice Class. 

See Music Education 417-418 for course description. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

441-442. Senior Voice. 

Completion of the work of the preceding years. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

443-444. Senior Voice. 

Completion of the work of the preceding years with particu- 
lar emphasis on teaching techniques and a large repertoire of 
teaching songs. Preparation of half of a recital. For Music Edu- 
cation candidates only. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 73 

445-446. Senior Voice. 

Completion of the work of the preceding years including 
Italian and French arias, the more difficult classic, romantic and 
modern songs; Duparc, Ravel, Respighi, Quilter, Griffes, Car- 
penter. Preparation of several programs. For B.M. candidates 
only. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 

Organ 

151-152. Freshman Organ. 

Materials selected from Organ 153-154. One movement of a 
sonata for organ such as Mendelssohn No. 2. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

153-154. Freshman Organ. 

A study of the organ touch and elementary registration 
principles. Scales and exercises for pedals and manual from 
Nevin, Stainer or Barnes. Short preludes and fugues by Bach. 
Bach Chorale-Preludes for manual alone. Bonnet, Guilmant, Men- 
delssohn and Rheinberger. Hymn playing. For B.M. candidates 
only. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 

251-252. Sophomore Organ. 

A Bach prelude and fugue selected from 253-254 and a 
chorale-prelude with pedal. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

253-254. Sophomore Organ. 

Pedal exercises, Bach, Chorale-Preludes with pedal. Bach 
Prelude and Fugue in C Major, or one of like difficulty. Karg- 
Elert, Chorale-Preludes. Hymn playing. For B.M. candidates 
only. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 

319-320. Elementary Organ Class. 

See Music Education 319-320 for course description. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

351-352. Junior Organ. 

Materials selected from Organ 353-354. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

353-354. Junior Organ. 

^ Further pedal studies. Bach, works from the Mature-Master 
period. Brahms, Choral-Preludes. Reger, Sowerby, Dupre and 
Franck. Choir accompanying. For B.M. candidates only. 
Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 



74 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

419-420. Advanced Organ Class. 

See Music Education 419-420 for course description. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

451-452. Senior Organ. 

Materials selected from 353-354 and 455-456. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

453-454. Senior Organ. 

Materials selected from 455-456. Choir accompanying. For 
Music Education candidates only. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

455-456. Senior Organ. 

Bach, Passacaglia and the Fantasy and Fugue in G. Minor, 
or its equivalent in difficulty. Franck, Chorals. Mendlessohn, 
Sixth Sonata. Vierne and Widor Symphonies. Choir accompany- 
ing. Representative works from the Contemporary School. For 
B.M. candidates only. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 

Violin 

161-162. Freshman Violin. 

Studies of Kayser, Sevcik, Kreutzer Etudes, Dont, Schrad- 
ieck. Major and minor scales and arpeggios. Works of Viotti, 
Deberiot. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

163-164. Freshman Violin. 

Major and minor scales and arpeggios in three octaves. 
Kreutzer, Etudes ; Rode Caprices ; Bach Concertos. Spohr, Vieux- 
temps. For B.M. candidates only. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 

261-262. Sophomore Violin. 

Major and minor scales in thirds and sixths. Arpeggios. 
Rode Caprices, Beethoven Sonatas. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 
263-264. Sophomore Violin. 

Major and minor scales in thirds and sixth and Arpeggios. 
Pieces comparable to difficulty of Wieniawski Caprices ; Campa- 
gnoli Divertissements. Beethoven Sonatas. For B.M. candidates 
only. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 
321-322. String Instruments Class. 

See Music Education 321-322 for course description. 
Credit : Two Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 75 

361-362. Junior Violin. 

Major and minor scales in thirds and sixths, arpeggios. Rode 
Caprices. Concertos of Viotti, Spohr. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

461-462. Senior Violin. 

Materials comparable to difficulty of Studies of Campagnoli, 
Dont, Bach, Concertos. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

463-464. Senior Violin. 

Selection of materials from pieces comparable in difficulty to 
Schradieck IV, Concertos of Wieniawski, Bruch. Scales in thirds, 
sixths and octaves. For Music Education candidates only. 
Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

465-466. Senior Violin. 

Scales in thirds, sixths, tenths and octaves. Materials com- 
parable to difficulty of Paganini Caprices and Concertos of Bee- 
thoven and Brahms. For B.M. candidates only. 
Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 

Students may elect other string instruments for credit by 
substituting the name of the specific instrument for violin — as 
Freshman Viola, Freshman Violoncello, etc. 

Clarinet 

171-172. Freshman Clarinet. 

Major and minor scales comfortable tempo. Materials select- 
ed from Clarinet 173-174. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

173-174. Freshm,an Clarinet. 

Major and minor scales comfortable tempo, arpeggios. Pieces 
comparable to difficulty of Etudes of Rose and the earlier books 
of Jean-Jean. For B.M. candidates only. 
Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 

271-272. Sophomore Clarinet. 

Major and minor scales increased tempo. Materials selected 
from Clarinet 273-274. Sight-reading. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

273-274. Sophomore Clarinet. 

Major and minor scales increased tempo, arpeggios. Ability 
to perform works of the difficulty of the Spohr Concerto No. 1, 
the Weber Concerto No. 1 and Grand Duo Concertante and the 
Saint-Saens Sonata. For B.M. candidates only. 
Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 



7 6 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



323-324. Woodwind Instruments Class. 

See Music Education 323-324 for course description. 
Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

371-372. Junior Clarinet, 

Continued study of techniques. Materials selected for the 
individual need and from Clarinet 373-374. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

373-374. Junior Clarinet. 

Continued study of technique. Representative sonatas for 
clarinet and piano as those by Brahms, Reger, Mason ; and Mozart 
Concerto. For B.M. candidates only. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 

471-472. Senior Clarinet. 

Study of techniques continued. Ability to sight-read. 
Further study of previous years. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

473-474. Senior Clarinet. 

Continued study of technique. Representative sonatas for 
clarinet and piano as those by Mason, Brahms, Bernstein and the 
Weber Concerto No. 2. For Music Education candidates only. 
Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

475-476. Senior Clarinet. 

Continued study of previous years with adequate ability in 
sight-reading. Selections representative of the Debussy Rhap- 
sodie and sonatas for clarinet and piano by Tuthill, Sowerby and 
Bernstein. For B.M. candidates only. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 

Students may elect other woodwind instruments for credit 
by substituting the name of the specific instrument for clarinet — 
as Freshman Flute, Freshman Oboe, etc. 

Trumpet 

181-182. Freshman Trumpet. 

Major and minor scales comfortable tempo. Materials select- 
ed from Trumpet 183-184. 

183-184. Freshman Trumpet. 

Major and minor scales comfortable tempo, arpeggios. Pieces 
comparable to difficulty of etudes as may be found in the Arban 
Method, Gatti, Part II or Petit ; 15 Technical Etudes, as written 
and also transposed as for C and A trumpets. For B.M. candi- 
dates only. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 77 

281-282. Sophomore Trumpet. 

Major and minor scales increased tempo. Materials selected 
from Trumpet 283-284. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

283-284. Sophomore Trumpet. 

Major and minor scales increased tempo, arpeggios. Ability 
to perform well works of the difficulty of Balay, Piece de Con- 
cours and Ropartz, Andante and Allegro. For B.M. candidates 
only. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 

325. Brass Instruments Class. 

See Music Education 325 for course description. 
Credit: One Semester Hour. 

381-382. Junior Trumpet. 

Continued study of technique. Materials selected for the 
individual need and from Trumpet 383-384. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

383-384. Junior Trumpet. 

Continued study of technique. Pieces representative of the 
Haydn and Giannini Concertos and the Sonatas of Hindemith. 
For B.M. candidates only. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 

481-482. Senior Trumpet. 

Continued study of technique. Sight-read and transpose 
parts written for trumpets in all keys. Further study of pre- 
vious years. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

483-484. Senior Trumpet. 

Continued study of previous years and pieces comparable to 
difficulty of Sonatas by Hindemith and Sowerby and the Vidal 
Concertino. For Music Education candidates only. 
Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

485-486. Senior Trumpet. 

Continued study of previous years with ability to sight-read 
and transpose parts written for trumpets in all keys. Selections 
representative of the Fitzgerald Concerto in A flat, the Vidal 
Concertino and the Sonatas of Hindemith and Sowerby. For B.M. 
candidates only. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 

Students may elect other brass instruments for credit by 
substituting the name of the specific instrument for trumpet — as 
Freshman French Horn, Freshman Trombone, etc. 



78 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

Ensemble 

190a-190b. College Chorus. 

An organization open to all students. The study and per- 
formance of sacred and secular choral literature of all periods. 
Designed as a cultural experience for all participants. Two hours 
a week. 

Credit: Two Semester hours. 

191a-191b. Concert Choir. 

A selected group for out-of-town concerts. The study and 
performance of sacred and choral literature of all periods is un- 
dertaken. Enrollment is restricted by instructor. Meets daily. 
Credit: Two Semester hours. 

192a-192b. Small Vocal Ensembles. 

Various quartets, sextets and octets will study and perform 
music particularly suited to small groups of trained singers. Two 
hours a week. 

Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

193a-193b. Piano Ensemble. 

The course includes terminology, sight-reading and playing 
four hand arrangements of Mozart Sonatas, the classic symp- 
honies and small compositions. A study of two-piano literature 
and arrangements for two pianos, four hands. Two hours a week. 
Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

194a-194b. String Ensemble. 

Intensive preparation in ensemble performance of standard 
literature for various combinations of strings and of strings with 
piano. Open to qualified students. Two hours a week. 
Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

195a-195b. Woodwind Ensemble. 

Performance of chamber music for woodwind instruments. 
Open to qualified students. Two hours a week. 
Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

196a-196b. Brass Ensemble. 

Performance of representative chamber music for brass 
instruments. Open to qualified students. Two hours a week. 
Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

197a-197b. Orchestra. 

Rehearsal and participation in concert programs. Open to 
qualified students. Two hours a week. 
Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

198a-198b. Band. 

Rehearsal and participation in performances for athletic, 
concert programs and other functions of the college. Open to all 
qualified students. Two hours a week. 
Credit: Two Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 79 

DIVISION OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

The Division of Language and Literature consists of three 
branches: (1) English — Language and Literature, (2) Modern 
Foreign Languages — French and Spanish and (3) Speech Arts. 

The aims of the division are the following: (1) To develop 
in the student the techniques of expression which will enable him 
to enjoy a pleasant social life and make a living, (2) To acquaint 
the student with his heritage of world literature, (3) To develop 
in the student a "linguistic sense" whereby he is able to compare 
his native tongue with other languages, (4) To develop foreign 
language skills whereby the student may engage in oral or writ- 
ten communication with other peoples of the world and (5) To 
enable the student to read scientific, literary and other treatises 
in a foreign language. 



OUTLINE OF A STUDENT'S WORK FOR A MAJOR 

The student majoring in Language and Literature must meet 
all of the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree. (See 
page 27). 

With the major emphasis on English 

Required : 24 semester hours composed of English 101, 102, 
201, 202, 301, 302, 303, 304. 

Elective: 12 semester hours to be chosen from any of the 
remaining courses in English. 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

Language 111, 112 or 121, 122 6 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

Language 211, 212 or 221, 222 6 hours 

Physical Science 6 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 



80 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

Junior Year 

English 301, 302 6 hours 

English 303, 304 6 hours 

Psychology 370 3 hours 

Psychology 3 72 3 hours 

Education 345 3 hours 

English 402 3 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Senior Year 

English 401, 402 6 hours 

Major Elective 3 hours 

Education 441 6 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Electives 12 hours 

With the major emphasis on French 

Required : 18 semester hours in French composed of French 
111, 112, 211, 212, 311, 312. 

Elective: 12 additional semester hours in French or 12 
semester hours in Spanish. 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

French 111, 112 6 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 ". 6 hours 

French 211, 212 6 hours 

Physical Science 6 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Electives 2 hours 

Junior Year 

Psychology 370 3 hours 

Psychology 372 3 hours 

Education 341 3 hours 

French 311, 312 6 hours 

French 315 3 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Electives 6 hours 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 81 

Senior Year 

French 411, 412 6 hours 

French 413, 414 6 hours 

Education 441 6 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Electives 9 hours 

With the major emphasis on Spanish 

Required : 18 semester hours composed of Spanish 121, 122, 
221, 222, 321, 322. 

Elective : 12 semester hours composed of additional courses 
in Spanish or 12 semester hours in French. 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101-102 6 hours 

Spanish 121, 122 6 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

Spanish 221, 222 6 hours 

Physical Science 6 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Junior Year 

Psychology 370 3 hours 

Psychology 3 72 3 hours 

Education 341 3 hours 

Spanish 325 3 hours 

Spanish 321, 322 6 hours 

Minor 12 hours 

Electives 3 hours 

Senior Year 

Spanish 421, 422 6 hours 

Education 441 6 hours 

Spanish 423, 424 6 hours 

Minor 6 hours 

Electives 12 hours 



82 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

With the major emphasis on Speech 

Curriculum I: For those interested in a general speech 
major. 

Required : 18 semester hours composed of Speech 131, 132, 
232, 234, 238, and 235 or 233. 

Elective: 12 semester hours to be chosen from any of the 
remaining 300 or 400 courses in Speech. 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Speech 132 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Elective 3 hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

Speech 23 2 3 hours 

Speech 233 3 hours 

Speech 234 3 hours 

Physical Science 6 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Junior Year 

Psychology 370 3 hours 

Psychology 372 3 hours 

Education 341 3 hours 

Speech 235 3 hours 

Speech 238 3 hours 

Language 6 hours 

Electives 3 hours 

Senior Year 

Language 6 hours 

Education 441 6 hours 

Minor 6 hours 

Electives 12 hours 

Curriculum II: For those interested in a combined em- 
phasis in speech and religion. 

Required: 21 semester hours composed of Speech 131, 132, 
232, 233, 234, 334, 335, 336. 

Elective: 12 semester hours composed of additional 300 
and 400 courses in Speech. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 83 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Speech 132 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Elective 3 hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

Speech 232 3 hours 

Speech 233 3 hours 

Speech 234 3 hours 

Physical Science 6 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Junior Year 

Psychology 370 3 hours 

Psychology 372 3 hours 

Education 341 3 hours 

Speech 334 2 hours 

Speech 335 2 hours 

Speech 33 6 2 hours 

Language 6 hours 

Electives 3 hours 

Senior Year 

Language 6 hours 

Education 441 6 hours 

Minor 6 hours 

Electives 12 hours 



84 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

OUTLINE OF A STUDENT'S WORK FOR A MINOR 

Required : 24 semester hours credit in English. 
18 semester hours credit in French. 
18 semester hours credit in Spanish. 
21 semester hours credit in Speech. 

Additional Suggestions: 

Students who plan to teach must fulfill the requirements for 
a Mississippi professional license. (See page 30). 

ENGLISH 

101-102. Composition and Grammar. 

A study of the fundamentals of English composition. Col- 
lateral reading and weekly themes are required. Three hours a 
week. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

103. Remedial Reading. 

A course designed for those who are deficient in reading. 
Number of hours to be arranged. 
Credit : None. 

104. Remedial Composition. 

A course intended for those who are found to be deficient 
in basic English grammar and composition. Number of hours 
to be arranged. 

Credit : None. 

201-202. Survey of English Literature. 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the growth 
and development of English Literature. Three Hours a week 
dui'ing the year. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

301-302. American Literature. 

A course designed to present American literature in the 
light of the historical setting from its beginning to the present. 
Three hours a week during the year. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

303-304. Shakespeare. 

A study of the major comedies and tragedies of Shakespeare. 
Three hours a week during the year. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 85 

305. MUton. 

A study of the major works of Milton. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

306. Chaucer. 

A study of the major works of Chaucer. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

307. The Romantic Movement in English Literature. 

A study of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats and Shel- 
ley. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

308. The Victorian Age. 

A study of the writers of the late nineteenth century in 
England. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

309. Advanced Grammar. 

A course in both prescriptive and descriptive grammar. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

401. Advanced Composition. 

A course in expository writing for advanced English stu- 
dents. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

402. The Teaching of English in the Secoyidary School. 

A course in methods designed for those who intend to teach 
English on the secondary level. Same as Education 945. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit : Three Semester Hours. 

403. Newswriting and Reporting. 

A study of the subject matter of news and news stories and 
practice in the writing of different types of news. Three hours 
a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

404. The Modern Novel. 

A study of masterpieces in novels in the twentieth century. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

405. Modern Poetry. 

A study of contemporary English and American poets. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit : Three Semester Hours. 



I 



36 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

406. Modern Drama. 

A course comprehending modern English and American 
drama. Three hours a week. 

Credit : Three Semester Hours. 
409. Creative Writing, 

A course designed to provide practice and guidance for stu- 
dents interested in creative writing. Three hours a week. 
Credit : Three Semester Hours. 

FRENCH 

111-112. Elementary French. 

An elementary course in grammar and reading with oral 
drill. Three hours a week during the year. 
Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

Note : No credit will be given on 111-112 if student has had 
two years or more high school French. 

211-212. Intermediate French. 

This course includes a review of pronunciation and gram- 
mar and selected readings of novels, dramas and short stories. 
Three hours a week during the year. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

Prerequisite: French 111-112 or two years of high school 
French. 

311-312. Survey of French Literature. 

This course consists of a survey of French literature and 
the reading of representative masterpieces. Collateral reading 
and individual reports are required. Three hours a week during 
the year. 

Credit : Six Semester Hours. 

315. The Teaching of Modern Languages. 
Same as Education 345. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

411-412. Nineteenth Century Literature. 

A study of nineteenth century poetry and drama. Three 
hours a week during the year. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

413-414. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century. 

A study of drama of the Golden Age of French literature. 
Three hours a week during the year. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 87 

SPANISH 

121-122. Elementary Spanish. 

An elementary course in grammar and reading with oral 
practice. Three hours a week during the year. 
Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

Note : No credit will be given on 121-122 if student has had 
two years or more high school Spanish. 

221-222. Intermediate Spanish. 

This course is intended to increase the student's ability to 
read more difficult Spanish. It includes a review of pronuncia- 
tion and grammar and selected readings. Three hours a week 
during the year. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

Prerequisite : Spanish 121-122 or two years of high school 
Spanish. 

321-322. Survey of Spanish Literature. 

This course consists of a survey of Spanish literature and 
the reading of representative masterpieces. Collateral reading 
and individual reports are required. Three hours a week during 
the year. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

325. The Teaching of Modern Languages. 
Same as Education 345. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

421-422. Spanish American Literature. 

This course includes a study of the works of some of the 
more important Spanish American authors primarily in the 
field of the novel and the short story. Three hours a week dur- 
ing the year. 

Credit : Six Semester Hours. 

423-424. Advanced Spanish Literature. 

The nature of this course will depend upon the needs and 
interests of the group concerned. A course in Spanish literature 
of a particular period might be offered. Three hours a week 
during the year. 

Credit : Six Semester Hours. 



SPEECH 

The objectives of the Speech Department are as follows : to 
enable the student to develop the ability to communicate ; to de- 
velop specialized abilities: public speaking, dramatics, argumen- 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



tation, interpretative reading, and to prepare teachers of speech ; 
to further in the first two objectives an approach that is both 
ethical in practice and spiritually guided in belief. 

130. Speech for Latin Americans. 

A course designed to help improve the English speech of 
Spanish speaking people. A non-credit course. 

131. Speech Fundamentals. 

Preparation for speaking situations such as reading aloud, 
participation in discussion groups, organizing and delivering 
short speeches, critical listening and evaluation. Does not count 
toward a speech major. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

132. Public Speaking. 

Composition, preparation, delivery and critical evaluation 
of prepared speeches. Prerequisites : Speech 131. Three hours a 
week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

230. Make-up. 

Application of principles and techniques of stage make-up. 
One hour a week. 

Credit: One Semester Hour. 

232. Phonetics. 

A study of the regional dialects of America — General Amer- 
ican, Southern, and Eastern; British or stage speech. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

233. Fundamentals of Interpretation. 

A study of the fundamental principles and techniques of 
oral interpretation. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

234. Debate. 

Principles of argumentation which include research and 
organization of argument and evidence ; delivery. Participation 
in inter-collegiate debate. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

235. Play Production. 

Basic techniques of play production; special laboratory 
problems in directing, lighting, make-up, scenery and costuming. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours, 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 89 

238. Voice Science. 

A study of speech from the physiological, neurological, phy- 
sical and psyr^hological approaches. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Setnester Hours. 

330. Play Directing. 

Methods and principles of play directing. Three hours a 
week. 

Credit : Three Semester Hours. 

331. Acting. 

Principles and practices orf acting. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

332. Advanced hiteiyretation. 

Application of the techniques of oral interpretation to the 
more difficult forms of literature. Prerequisite: Speech 233. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

333. History of the Theatre. 

Development of drama from its origin to the present. Three 
ht)urs a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

334. SerTYion Preparation and Practice. 

Fundamental principles of sermon preparation and prac- 
tice. Two hours a week. 

Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

335. Oral Interpretation of the Bible. 

Selections from the Old and New Testaments are used as 
a basis for application of principles of interpretation and criti- 
cism. Two hours a week. 

Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

336. Drama for the Church. 

Study of available dramatic literature and the technologi- 
cal aspects for utilization in church drama. Two hours a week. 
Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

338. Parliamentary Procedure. 

Principles and practices of parliamentary procedure. Two 
hours a week. 

Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

339. Advanced Debate. 

Application of the principles of argumentation to debate. 
Prerequisite: Speech 132 and 234. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



90 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

430. British Oratory. 

A study of the British orators from the 18th century to the 
present day. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

432. History of American Speech Education. 
Development of speech education in America. Three hours 

a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

433. Radio. 

Fundamental principles of announcing, directing, acting 
and writing. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

434. Speech Correction. 

A study of the recognition of the various types of speech 
defects. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

435. Seminar in Speech. 

An independent study and research course for seniors in 
speech. The course is adapted to the needs of each student. 
Two hours a week. 

Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

436. Methods and Principles of Teaching of Speech. 
Methods and principles used in teaching of speech. Three 

hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 91 

DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCE 

The Division of Natural Science consists of five branches: 
(1) Biology, (2) Chemistry, (3) Physics, (4) Mathematics and 
(5) Home Economics. 

The aims of the division are the following : (1) To provide 
culture and appreciation of things of the animate and the inani- 
mate world, (2) To correlate the basic facts and ideas of the 
various fields of science, (3) To furnish a foundation for fur- 
ther study in technical and professional schools and (4) To pro- 
vide courses which will prepare students to teach science in ele- 
mentary and secondary schools or to pursue successfully graduate 
study in their chosen fields. 

Pre-professional Training 

Students who are planning to enter professional schools for 
scientific careers such as medicine, dentistry, or nursing are 
urged to complete requirements for a degree before beginning 
their professional training. For these professions the student 
should take a major in either biology, chemistry, or general sci- 
ence with a minor in one not chosen for a major. If the student 
finds it impossible to complete a degree, he is advised to include 
the following courses in his pre-professional program : 

English 6 hours 

Foreign language, preferably French or German....! 2 hours 

Biology 18 hours 

Chemistry 22 hours 

Physics 8 hours 

Mathematics 6 hours 

Psychology 6 hours 



OUTLINE OF A STUDENT'S WORK FOR A MAJOR 

The student majoring in science must meet all of the re- 
quirements for the Bachelor of Science degree. (See page 28). 

With the major emphasis on Biology 

Required : 36 semester hours composed of Biology 101, 102, 
201, 202, 301, 302, 403, 404, and Chemistry 111, 112. 

Fresliinan Year 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 



92 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

Chemistry 111, 112 8 hours 

Biology 201, 202 8 hours 

Mathematics 131, 132 6 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Social Science 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Junior Year 

Biology 301, 302 8 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Psychology 372 3 hours 

Education 341 3 hours 

Science 315 3 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Electives 3 hours 

Senior Year 

Biology 405, 406 6 hours 

Chemistry 317, 318 8 hours 

Psychology 370 3 hours 

Education 441 6 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

(Those who wish to qualify to teach physics in high school 

should elect Physics 121, 122.) 

With the major emphasis on Chemistry- 
Required: 36 semester hours composed of Chemistry 111, 
112, 211, 212, 317, 318, 411, 412 and Physics 121, 122. 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

Chemistry 111, 112 8 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

Mathematics 131, 132 6 hours 

Chemistry 211, 212 6 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Social Science 6 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 93 

Junior Year 

Chemistry 317, 318 8 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Psychology 372 3 hours 

Education 341 3 hours 

Chemistry 315 3 hours 

Physics 121, 122 S hours 

Minor 5 hours 

Senior Year 

Chemistry 411, 412 6 hours 

Biology 301, 302 8 hours 

Psychology 370 3 hours 

Education 441 6 hours 

Minor 13 hours 

With the major emphasis on General Science 

Required: 45 or 47 semester hours composed of Biology 
101, 102 and 201-202 or 301-302; Chemistry 111, 112, 315 and 
211-212 or 317-318; Math 131, 132; and Physics 121, 122. 

Freshman Year 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

Chemistry 111, 112 8 hours 

Mathematics 131, 132 6 hours 

Biology 201-202 or 301-302 8 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Junior Year 

Chemistry 211, 212 6 hours 

or 317, 318 8 hours 

Physics 121, 122 8 hours 

Psychology 372 3 hours 

Education 341 3 hours 

Cheir'rtTy 315 3 hours 

MiTtO" 8 or 10 hours 



94 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

Senior Year 

Psychology 370 - 3 hours 

Education 441 6 hours 

Minor 10 hours 

Electives 15 hours 

With the major emphasis on Mathematics 

Required: 21 semester hours composed of Math 131, 132, 
281, 232, 331, 332, 431. 

Elective : 9 hours of Math or Physics 121-122 and 3 hours 

of Math. 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 102 6 liours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

Math 131, 132 6 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Mathematics 134 3 hours 

Mathematics 231, 232 6 hours 

Physical Science 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Junior Year 

Mathematics 331, 332 6 hours 

Psychology 370 3 hours 

Psychology 3 72 3 hours 

Education 341 3 hours 

Chemistry 315 3 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Electives 6 hours 

Senior Year 

Mathematics 431, 432 6 hours 

Education 441 3 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Physics 121, 122 8 hours 

Electives 7 hours 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 95 

With the major emphasis on Home Economics 

Required : 41 semester hours composed of Home Economics 
141, 142, 241, 242, 341, 342, 345, 441, 442 and 444 and Chemistry 
111, 112. 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Home Economics 141, 142 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Electives 2 hours 

Sophoanore Year 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

Chemistry 111, 112 8 hours 

Education 346 3 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Home Economics 241, 242 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Junior Year 

Psychology 370 3 hours 

Home Economics 341, 342 6 hours 

Sociology 211, 312 6 hours 

Psychology 3 72 3 hours 

Home Economics 345 3 hours 

Psychology 371 3 hours 

Home Economics 344 3 hours 

Chemistry 317, 318 or Physics 121, 122 8 hours 

Senior Year 

Home Economics 441, 442 6 hours 

Home Economics 444 3 hours 

Chemistry 417 3 hours 

Economics 309 3 hours 

Education 3 41 3 hours 

Education 441 6 hours 

Education 343 3 hours 

Electives 6 hours 

OUTLINE OF A STUDENT'S WORK FOR A MINOR 

Required : 18 semester hours in Biology. 

18 semester hours in Chemistry. 

18 semester hours in Mathematics. 

18 semester hours in Home Economics selected from 

the following courses : 141, 241, 341, 142, 242, 344, 

347, 348, 349. 



96 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



BIOLOGY 

101-102. General Biology. 

An introduction to the facts and principles underlying plant 
and animal biology. The laboratory work consists of exercises to 
familiarize the student with the structure and life processes of 
plants and animals. Lectures and recitations, two hours; labo- 
ratory, two hours a week during the year. Prerequisite for all 
advanced courses. 

Credit : Six Semester Hours. 

201. General Zoology. 

A study of the morphology, physiology and relationships of 
all phyla of the animal kingdom. Laboratory work consists of the 
study of representative forms not included in Biology 101-102. 
Lectures and recitations, three hours; laboratory, two hours a 
week. 

Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

202. General Botany. 

A study of morphology, physiology, and life histories of rep- 
resentative plants, with special consideration of seed-bearing 
plants. Laboratory work consists of the study of typical forms 
in each division of the plant kingdom. Lectures and recitations, 
three hours ; laboratory, two hours a week. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

301. Human Physiology and A^iatomy. 

The object of this course is to give the student a general un- 
derstanding of the structure and functions of the tissues and 
organ systems in the human body. Laboratory examinations of 
preserved specimens, charts, models, microscope slides, and de- 
monstration materials from the human and closely related mam- 
mals supplement the lecture and reference studies. Recitation 
and lectures, three hours; laboratory, two hours a week. 
Credit: Four Semester Hours. 

302. General Bacteriology. 

A study of micro-organisms with special emphasis on repre- 
sentative molds, yeasts, and bacteria as related to household eco- 
nomics, various industries, agriculture, and public health. Labo- 
ratory work includes the preparation of culture media, growing 
and studying of various representative species of bacteria, yeasts 
and molds. The development of routine technique in handling 
and studying bacteria is emphasized. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
111-112. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours a week. 

Credit : Four Semester Hours. 
403-404. Vertebrate Zoology. 

A study of the morphology, life processes, and relationship 
of representative vertebrates. In the laboratory selected verte- 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 97 

brates are dissected and examined. Lecture, one hour ; laboratory, 
four hours a week. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 
405-406. Special Problems. 

This course will allow properly qualified students to under- 
take special studies in assigned fields. Only students who have 
the consent of the instructor will be allowed to register for the 
course. Hours to be arranged. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

408. Genetics. 

A study of heredity, including considerations of the ma- 
terial basis of heredity, the question of the inheritance of ac- 
quired characteristics, the laws which govern the distribution of 
unit factors, and the application of these laws to human inheri- 
tance. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

CHEMISTRY 

Pre-medical students, pre-medical technologists, home eco- 
nomics majors, and those who plan to major in science are ad- 
vised to begin chemistry not later than the sophomore year, be- 
cause of the necessary sequence of courses. 

111-112. General Inorganic Chemistry. 

An introductory course laying stress on the fundamental 
principles of the science. It is prerequisite to all other courses 
in chemistry. A thorough understanding of chemical reactions 
is required. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory each 
week during the year. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 
115. Survey of Physical Science. 

A non-laboratory course which furnishes a background in 
the physical sciences for those who are not working toward a 
major in any science. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

211. Qualitative Analysis. 

The theories of solutions, solubilities, ironization, precipita- 
tion, etc., are studied in detail, and their applications to the 
separation and identification of the metallic and acid radicals con- 
stitute the subject matter of this course. Correct manipulation 
processes and laboratory technique are stressed. Three two-hour 
periods each week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

212. Quantitative Analysis. 

Both volumetric and gravimetric processes are studied and 
made to supplement each other. The theories underlying the 



98 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



various processes are considered in detail. Three two-hour 
periods each week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

315. Methods and Materials for the Teaching of Science in 
Secondary Schools. 
This course is designed to give training to those who plan 
to teach high school science. Selections of subject matter and ma- 
terials to be used will be emphasized. This course gives credit 
in the division of education as Education 345. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

317-318. Organic Chemistry. 

A systematic study of the aliphatic and aromatic series of 
some of the more modern theories as are illustrated by organic 
compounds. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory 
period each week during the year. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 

411-412. Theoretical Chemistry. 

This is an elementary course in physical chemistry without 
the rigorous mathematical application. Two lectures and one 
two-hour laboratory period each week during the year. Course 
411 may be taken without 412. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

417. F'ood and Biochemistry. 

A study of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, water and minerals, 
together with a chemistry of these compounds, their digestion 
and assimilation as food materials. Enzymes, hormones, vita- 
mins, and the like, also have a place in the discussion. Two hours 
theory and two hours laboratory each week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

419. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. 

This course is a continuation of 212, which is a prerequisite. 
The field is extended to simple organic chemistry and such meth- 
ods as will be of interest to the medical technologist or any other 
field in which the student may have an interest. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



PHYSICS 

121-122. General Physics. 

A study of the fundamental principles of matter, heat, me- 
chanics, light, sound, magnetism and electricity. Three hours 
theory and two hours laboratory each week during the year. 

Credit: Eight Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 99 

129. Physics of Music. 

A course in physics designed especially for students of music. 
It is a study of the nature and transmission of sound, interfer- 
ence, hearing, resonance, pitch, quality, musical intervals and 
temperament, musical strings and stringed instruments, and 
acoustics of rooms. Lectures two hours, laboratory two hours a 
week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

MATHEMATICS 

130. Review of High School Mathematics. 

A course required of students who are deficient in Mathe- 
matics. 

Credit : None. 

131. College Algebra. 

This course is a brief summary of elementary algebra, linear 
equations, rectangular coordinates, exponents and quadratic 
equations. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

132. Plane Trigonometry. 

A study of trigonometry functions: equations, identities, 
theory of projection, right triangles, oblique triangle, logarithms. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

134. Advanced College Algebra. 

A continuation of Mathematics 131, including the binomial 
theorem, progTession, complex numbers, permutations and com- 
binations, probability and determinants. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 131. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

231. Analytic Geometry. 

A study of algebraic methods in solving geometric problems : 
curves, cartesian coordinates, straight line, circles, parabolas, 
ellipses, hyperbola, transformation. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
131 and 132. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

232. Plain and Solid Analytic Geometry. 

A continuation of Mathematics 231, including polar coordi- 
nates, higher plane curves, solids. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
231. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



100 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

331. Differential Calculus. 

A study of differentiation and applications, transcendental 
functions, parametric and polar equations. Prerequisite : Mathe- 
matics 231. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

332. Integral Calculus. 

A study of integration, definite integral applications. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 231. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

431. Differential Equations. 

A study of ordinary and partial differential equations, series. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 332. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

432. Differential Equations. 

A continuation of Mathematics 431, including equations of 
hypogeometric series, second order. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
431. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Clothing and Textiles 

141. Clothing Selection and Construction. 

A study of fundamental principles of garment construction 
and selection ; use of commercial patterns in construction of sim- 
ple garments; and application of the principles of color and de- 
sign to the selection of a wardrobe suited to the coloring, per- 
sonality, and activities of the individual. Art 11 is prerequisite 
or parallel. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours each 
week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

241. Textiles and Clothing. 

A course designed to develop good judgment in buying, 
using, and caring for clothing and household materials and to 
enable the student to identify and classify standard fibres and 
fabrics. Prerequisite: Home Economics 141. Lecture, one 
hour; laboratory, four hours each week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

341. Housing and Interior Decoration. 

A course planned to give real insight into the need of home- 
making based on a high type of living, to discover trends in 
housing and house furnishing and to give some knowledge of 
developments in principles of design and color in relation to the 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 101 

selection and arrangement of house furnishings. Three hours 
lecture. Special field trips. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

441. Clothing for the Family. 

A study and selection of clothing for the family, including 
selection and care of garments suitable for various members of 
the family with special consideration of economic problems. Pre- 
requisite: Home Economics 141 and 241. Lecture, one hour; 
laboratory, four hours each week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

Food and Nutrition 

142. Food Study and Preparation. 

A study of the source, composition, and economic value of 
foods, including practice of cookery in the planning, preparation, 
and serving of simple, balanced meals in family groups. Fee 
$5.00. Prerequisite or parallel, Chemistry 111-112. Lecture, 
one hour; laboratory, four hours. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

242. Meal Planning and Table Service. 

An advanced course in which a study is made of the prob- 
lems involved in the purchase of food and in the planning, pre- 
paration, and serving of meals, both formal and informal. This 
course includes the study of the selection of silver, linen, china, 
and glassware, also table decorations, with field trips to the stores 
where they may be purchased. Fee $5.00. Lecture, one hour; 
laboratory, four hours each week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

342. Elementary Nutrition and Dietetics. 

A study of the adequate diet for normal adults and chil- 
dren, including planning, preparing, and serving balanced meals 
for all members of the family. It also includes a study of chem- 
istry of digestion. Fee $5.00. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, 
two hours each week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

344. Home Nursing. 

A study and demonstration of techniques in caring for the 
sick at home. Problems considered are care of the patient in 
bed, special diets, care of the sick room, and the home medicine 
cabinet. 

Credit: Two Semester Hours. 

345. Methods of Teaching Home Economics. 

A course in the development of the home economics curricu- 
lum, in equipment and in methods of teaching in various types of 



102 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

schools, student teaching opportunities are provided, same as 
Education 345. Lecture, two hours ; laboratory, three hours each 
week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

347. Family Relationships. 

A course designed to develop an understanding of factors 
that play a part in successful family life and to prepare one for 
family living. Recitations and lecture three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

348. Household Equipment. 

A study of fundamentals involved in the selection, opera- 
tion, care, and efficiency of household equipment and other prob- 
lems of household operation. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

349. Home and Family Living. 

Your home and you. Management of family, its resources, 
its problems of everyday life. Lecture, two hours, laboratory, 
two hours. For men and women. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

442. Experimental Cookery. 

A study of elementary research of food preparation, experi- 
mentation to determine factors affecting standard products, and 
a study of large quantity cooking. Fee $5.00. Lecture, one 
hour; laboratory, four hours each week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

443. Child Development. 

A study of the needs of the child as to food, rest, habit 

formation and recreation from prenatal period through school 

period. A special study of behavior problems. Prerequisite: 

Senior standing. Lecture, three hours with special field trips. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

444. Economics of the Home. 

A study of problems of consumers and standards by which 
consumers may judge available merchandise. Also, a study of 
wise use of time, energy, money and resources of the home. Lec- 
ture, three hours each week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 103 

DIVISION OF RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY 

The Division of Religion and Philosophy seeks (1) To aid the 
student in his interpretation of life, (2) To acquaint him with the 
spiritual heritage of the race, (3) To deepen his appreciation of 
Christianity by leading him to see the Christian religion in the 
light of man's total religious experience and (4) to train young 
people who, after further study at a seminary or divinity school, 
will furnish leadership for the churches. 



OUTLINE OF A STUDENT'S WORK FOR A MAJOR 

The student majoring in Religion and Philosophy must meet 
all the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree. (See page 
28). 

With the major emphasis on Biblical Studies 

Required: 24 semester hours composed of the following 
courses : Religion 101, 103, 104, 301 or 302, 303, 307, 308 or 309, 
and Philosophy 331. 

Elective : 6 semester hours chosen from any courses in the 
Division. 

Freshman Year 

Religion 101, 103 6 hours 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Language 111, 112 or 121, 122 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

Religion 104 3 hours 

Philosophy 331 3 hours 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

Language 211, 212 or 221, 222 6 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Physical Science 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Junior Year 

Religion 301 or 302 3 hours 

Religion 303 3 hours 

Religion 307 3 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Electives 9 hours 



104 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

Senior Year 

Religion 308 or 309 3 hours 

Religion and Philosophy Electives 6 hours 

Minor 9 lioiii's 

Electives 15 hours 

With tho major emphasis on Religious Education 

Required: 24 semester hours composed of the following 
courses: Religion 101, 103, 104, 211, 311 or 312, 411 or 412, 
415 and Philosophy 331. 

Elective: 6 semester hours chosen from other courses in 
the Division. 

Freshman Year 

Religion 101, 103 6 hours 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Language 111, 112 or 121, 122 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

Religion 104 3 hours 

Philosophy 331 3 hours 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

Language 211, 212 or 221, 222 6 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Physical Science 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Junior Year 

Religion 211 3 hours 

Religion 311 or 312 3 hours 

Religion 411 or 412 3 hours 

Psychology 271 - 3 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Electives 9 hours 

Senior Year 

Religion 415 3 hours 

Religion and Philosophy Electives 6 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Electives 15 hours 

(Courses in secretarial science are recommended). 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 105 

With the major emphasis on History and Philosophy of Religion 

Required: 24 semester hours composed of the following 
courses : Religion 101, 103, 104, 321, 322, 429 and Philosophy 331 
and 434. 

Elective: 6 semester hours chosen from other courses in 
the Division. 

Freshman Year 

Religion 101, 103 6 hours 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Language 111, 112 or 121, 122 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

Religion 104 3 hours 

Philosophy 331 3 hours 

English 201, 202 6 houra 

Language 211, 212 or 221, 222 6 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Physical Science 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Junior Year 

Religion 321, 322 6 hours 

Philosophy 434 3 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Electives 9 hours 

Senior Year 

Religion 429 3 hours 

Religion and Philosophy Electives 6 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Electives 15 hours 



OUTLINE OF A STUDENT'S WORK FOR A MINOR 

Required: Religion 101, 103, 104 and Philosophy 331. 
Elective: 6 additional hours in the Division. 

Additional Suggestions: 

Elective courses should be chosen under the supervision of 
the major professor. These, as far as possible, should come from 
the field of concentration of the student. 



106 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

A Religious Education major should take some tj'-ping and 
shorthand if he has not already had sufficient training in secre- 
tarial science. 

No major in Philosophy is offered. 



BIBLICAL STUDIES 

101. Biblical Backgrounds. 

An approach to the study of the Bible; how to know the 
Bible. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

103. Introduction to the Old Testament. 

A survey of the history of the religion of the Hebrew nation. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

104. Introduction to the Neiv Testament. 

A survey of the life and teachings of Jesus and of the Apos- 
tolic age. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours, 

201. The Bible and Literature. 

A study of the influence of the Bible upon literature. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

301. The Pentateuch 

A study of the first five books of the Old Testament. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

302. Poetical and Wisdom Literature of the Old Testament. 
An appreciation course covering Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ec- 

clesiastes. Song of Solomon and Lamentations. Three hours a 
week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

303. Old Testament Prophets. 

A study of the ethical and religious idealism of the Hebrew 
prophets. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

307. Life of Christ. 

A study of the life of Christ as recorded in the four Gospels. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 107 

308. Life and Letters of Paul. 

A study of the life and teachings of Paul as recorded in the 
Acts and the Pauline Epistles. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

309. The General Epistles of the Neiv Testament. 

A survey of the general epistles of the New Testament. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

211. Survey of Religious Education. 

A survey of the field of religious education. Three hours a 
week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

311. Principles and Methods of Religious Education. 

A study of approved educational principles as they apply to 
religious instruction, with methods and materials for use on va- 
rious age and interest levels. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

312. Local Church Organization and Efficiency. 

A study of the function, organization, and relationship of 
the various group organizations within the church. Three hours 
a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

411. Curriculum Building in Religious Education. 

A study of the course of study for each division of the 
church's educational program. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

412. Christian Worship. 

A study of the art of individual and corporate worship. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

415. Religious Education as a Vocation. 

A course designed for prospective religious education direc- 
tors. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION 

321-322. A History of Religions. 

An historical study of the religions of the world. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 



108 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

325. Psychology of Religion. 

A study of the psychology of religious experiences. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

421-422. History of Christianity. 

A study of the history of the Christian movement from 
Jesus to the present time. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

423. Carey and Christian Missions. 

A study of the life and work of William Carey. Three hours 
a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

425. Christian Ethics 

A study of the ethical and social principles of Jesus as ap- 
plied to moral choices one must make in the present day. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

426. Primitive Religion. 

A study of the "primitive" religions in existence today. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

427. The Religions of the Far East. 

A study of Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Confuci- 
anism, Taoism, Shinto. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

428. The Religions of the Near East. 

A study of Zoroastrianism and the Semitic religions. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

429. Christianity and the Non-Christian Religions. 

The finality of Christianity as a world religion. Three hours 
a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



PHILOSOPHY 

331. Introduction to Philosophy. 

A general survey of the major problems of philosophy. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 109 

333. History of Philosophy-Ancient and Medieval. 

A survey of the great thinkers of antiquity with an empha- 
sis on Plato and Aristotle. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

334. History of Philosophy-Modern. 

A study of philosophers since the Renaissance. Three hours 
a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

431. Ethics. 

A study of the science of human conduct. Three hours a 
week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

432. Logic. 

A study of the various types of logical theory. Three hours 
a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

434. Philosophy of Religion. 

A study of the philosophical problems related to the existence 
and nature of God, the problem of evil and human destiny. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

435. Christianity and Modern Philosophy. 

A study of Christianity and current thought. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



110 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCE 

The aims of the Division of Social Science are these: (1) 
To offer courses through which any student may better under- 
stand and appreciate his cultural heritage and make successful 
adjustment to all life situations that involve other people, (2) 
To enable majors to qualify as teachers of the social studies in 
the public schools, (3) To furnish a foundation for those stu- 
dents who desire to pursue graduate studies in the field or who 
plan to enter graduate schools of social work in preparation for a 
social work career. 



OUTLINE OF A STUDENT'S WORK FOR A MAJOR 

The student majoring in History and Social Science must 
meet all of the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree. 
(See page 28) . 

With the major emphasis on History 

Required: 21 semester hours composed of the following 
courses: History 101, 102, 201, 202, 401, 402 and Political Sci- 
ence 321. 

Elective: 9 semester hours chosen from other 300-400 
courses in History. 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

History 101, 102 or 201, 202 6 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Electives 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

History 201, 202 or 101, 102 — - 6 hours 

Language 111, 112 or 121, 122 6 hours 

Physical Science 6 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Minor 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 111 

Junior Year 

Language 211, 212 or 221, 222 6 hours 

Psychology 370, 372 6 hours 

Education 341 3 hours 

History 3 05 3 hours 

Political Science 321 3 hours 

History 401 3 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Electives 2 hours 

Senior Year 

History 402 3 hours 

Education 441 6 hours 

Major 6 hours 

Minor 6 hours 

Electives 9 hours 

With the major emphasis on Sociology 

Required: 18 semester hours composed of the following 
courses: Sociology 211, 311, 312, 313, 411, 414. 

Elective: 12 semester hours chosen from other 300-400 
courses in Sociology. 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

History 201, 202 6 hours 

Language 111, 112 or 121, 122 6 hours 

Physical Science 6 hours 

Sociology 211, 311 6 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Psychology 271 S hours 

Junior Year 

Language 211, 212 or 221, 222 6 hours 

Psychology 370, 372 6 hours 

Education 341 3 hours 

Sociology 305 3 hours 

Political Science 3 hours 

Sociology 312 3 hours 

Minor 9 hours 



112 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

Senior Year 

Sociology 313 3 hours 

Sociology 411 3 hours 

Sociology 414 3 hours 

Education 441 6 hours 

Major 9 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

With the major emphasis on Political Science 

Required : 24 semester hours composed of History 201, 202 
and Political Science 321, 322, 421, 422, 425, 426. 

Elective : 6 additional hours in the division. 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Electives - 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

Political Science 321 3 hours 

Language 111, 112 or 121, 122 6 hours 

Physical Science 6 hours 

History 201, 202 6 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Psychology 271 -. 3 hours 

Junior Year 

Language 211, 212 or 221, 222 6 hours 

Psychology 370, 372 6 hours 

Education 341 3 hours 

History 305 3 hours 

Political Science 322 3 hours 

Political Science 421 3 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Electives 2 hours 

Senior Year 

Political Science 422 3 hours 

Education 441 3 hours 

Major 9 hours 

Minor 9 hours 

Electives 6 hours 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 113 

With the major emphasis on Social Science 

Required : 24 semester hours composed of History 101, 102, 
201, 202, 305, Sociology 211, Political Science 321 and Economics 
201. 

Elective: 15 semester hours "above 300" including at least 
one course in geography. 

Freshman Year 

English 101, 102 6 hours 

Biology 101, 102 6 hours 

History 101, 102 6 hours 

Religion 6 hours 

Speech 131 3 hours 

Health 130 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Electives 2 hours 

Sophomore Year 

English 201, 202 6 hours 

History 201, 202 6 hours 

Language 111, 112 or 121, 122 6 hours 

Physical Science 6 hours 

Fine Arts 3 hours 

Sociology 211 3 hours 

Physical Education 2 hours 

Psychology 271 3 hours 

Junior Year 

Language 211, 212 or 221, 222 6 hours 

Psychology 370, 372 6 hours 

Education 341 3 hours 

History 305 3 hours 

Political Science 321 3 hours 

Minor 12 hours 

Electives 2 hours 

Senior Year 

Economics 201 3 hours 

Major Electives (including geography) 12 hours 

Minor 6 hours 

Education 441 6 hours 

Electives 6 hours 



OUTLINE OF A STUDENT'S WORK FOR A MINOR 

Required : 18 semester hours credit in one field of the divi- 
sion exclusive of History 101, 102. 



114 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

Additional Suggestions: 

It is recommended that all majors in the division meet the 
state requirements for teaching Social Science in high school. 

HISTORY 

101-102. World History. 

A study of the rise and development of civilization in Asia, 
Africa, and Europe, with emphasis on the Mediterranean basin, 
from earliest times to the present. First semester, to about 1500 
A. D. Second semester, to the present. Required for graduation. 
Three hours a week during the year. 

Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

201-202. American History. 

A study of American history from colonial times to the 
present, on the basis of political, economic, social, and cultural 
factors. First semester, to 1865. Second semester, since 1865. 
Required for majors. Three hours a week during the year. 
Credit: Six Semester Hours. 

302. American Colonial History. 

A study of American history from the first European set- 
tlements in North America to the American Revolution, em- 
phasizing the various factors of colonial life and development. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

303. Modern British History. 

A study of British history from the beginning of the Tu- 
dors to the present, with emphasis on Britain's balance of power 
position, the evolution of the British Commonwealth of Nations, 
and the changing world significance of Britain. Three hours a 
week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

304. Greek and Roman History. 

An interpretation of the Greco-Roman civilization and the 
tracing of its influence on the life of the western world. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

305. Teaching the Social Sciences. 

A course in materials and methods. Required for teacher 
certification. Same as Education 345. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 115 

401. Southern History. 

A study of the cultural, political, and industrial develop- 
ment of the South, with an interpretation of the effects of slav- 
ery, the Civil War, and natural resources on present day insti- 
tutions and concepts. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

402. Europe Since 1870. 

A study showing the roots of recent conflict and totalitar- 
ianism and helping in the interpretation of current world events. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

403. The Far East. 

_ The social, political, religious, and economic concepts of the 
nations of East Asia in relation to their geographical setting, to 
each other and to the western nations. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

404. Latin American History. 

A study of Latin American history from the time of settle- 
ment to the present. Emphasis on the problems of the southern 
republics and their relations with the United States. Three hours 
a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

405. Recent American History. 

A study of the United States in the twentieth century, high- 
lighting America's new expanding role in world affairs and new 
developments in the economic and cultural spheres. Three hours 
a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

406. History of Russia. 

A survey of Russian development from early times through 
the czars to the present day. Emphasis is on development under 
Communist rulers. Prerequisite: 101-102. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

409. Seminar in History. 

For advanced students with special interests. Subjects and 
hours to be arranged. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

SOCIOLOGY 
211. Principles of Sociology. 

A survey of the field, including the principles of group be- 
havior and the factors in social change. Prerequisite to all other 
courses in sociology except 313. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



116 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

311. Our Social Institutions. 

A careful survey of the domestic, political, religious, eco- 
nomic, educational, recreational, and scientific institutions, with 
their historical backgrounds, to facilitate understanding of the 
various phases of human endeavor. Required of majors. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

312. The American Family. 

The study of the structure and function of the American 
Family as a social institution. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

313. Family Relationships. 

The same as Home Economics 347. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

314. Introduction to Social Problems. 

A study of contemporary problems in American life in the 
light of the social processes which cause them. Three hours a 
week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

315. Teaching the Social Sciences. 

The same as History 305 and Education 345. Three hours a 
week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

316. Rural-Urban Sociology. 

A comparative study of rural and urban society from the 
standpoint of the special problems, advantages, resources, and 
trends in each of these two ways of life. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

317. Christian Ethics. 

The same as Religion 425. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 
411. Race Relations. 

A study of the racial and national origins of Americans, with 
particular attention to the problem of different races occupying 
the same geographical area, the assumption being that this 
necessary geographical nearness can be made both harmonious 
and mutually helpful. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

413. Criminology. 

The nature of crime, its historical development, criminogenic 
factors in physical and social environment. Prerequisite: 211 
or consent of professor. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 117 

414. Introduction to Social Work. 

A course designed for those planning to enter social work as 
a career. Textbook supplemented by community surveys and 
field trips. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

415. History of Social Thought. 

A study of the development of social thought, including 
the evolution of social theories of leading social thinkers, with 
special emphasis on the relationship of social thought or social 
forces of the time and an attempt to draw generalizations on these 
relationships. Prerequisite: 211 or consent of professor. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

416. History of Social Thought. 

A continuation of 415. Prerequisite Same as 415. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

418. Seminar in Social Work. 

A course for majors with special interests. Subjects and 
hours of meeting to be arranged. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

321. American Government. 

The basic principles of government on all levels but with 
major emphasis on the national level. Prerequisite to all other 
political science courses. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

322. American State and Local Government. 

Basic ideas of state government throughout America, with 
an added emphasis on special Mississippi features and problems. 
Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

421. American Foreign Relations. 

This course combines the study of American diplomacy with 
a survey of the development of our foreign policy. Three hours 
a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

422. International Relations. 

A study of organized relations between nations and the 
factors that determine their nature. Three hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



118 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

425. World Geography. 

A study of the effect of nature upon the history of dif- 
ferent sections of the earth. Three hours a week. 
Credit: Three Semester Hours. 

426. Political Geography. 

A study of the political significance of geography. Three 
hours a week. 

Credit: Three Semester Hours. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 121 

William Carey College seeks to adjust her total program to 
the life and needs of her particular community. Since it is recog- 
nized that Mississippi is largely rural and agricultural, expenses 
are trimmed to the absolute minimum consistent with quality 
academic work. Every fee charged covers a desirable service 
or necessity for highest well-being of school and students. 

The Schedule of Expenses 

I. For Day Students: 

Student Government fee $ 20.00 

Matriculation 30.00 

Tuition 120.00 

$170.00 
n. For Dormitory Students: 

Student Government fee $ 20.00 

Matriculation 30.00 

Tuition 120.00 

Room and Board 330.00 

Medical fee 10.00 

$510.00 

m. studio Fees: 

Piano (2 lessons per week) $100.00 

Voice (2 lessons per week) 100.00 

Violin (2 lessons per week) 100.00 

Organ (2 lessons per week) 100.00 

Class Piano Fee 15.00 

Class Voice Fee 15.00 

Class Organ Fee 15.00 

Art (Private instruction) 90.00 

Speech Arts (Private lessons) 90.00 

rV. Laboratory Fees (For full year course) : 

Chemistry $ 10.00 

Biology 10.00 

Physics 10.00 

Home Economics 10.00 

Typing (per semester) 5.00 

Office Machines 5.00 

Graduation fee 12.75 

Music practice fee (per semester) 5.00 

V. Miscellaneous Fees: 

Literary tuition for students not taking full work, 

Per semester hour I 5.00 

Fee for taking a literary course without credit per 

semester hour $ 5.00 

Physical Education Activity Fee (Per Course) 1.00 

General Financial Regulations 

An application fee of $10.00 is charged each applicant at 
the time of making application. It is required to reserve a room 
in the case of dormitory students; or in the case of local stu- 



122 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

dents, a place on the student roster. It is refundable only in the 
event notice of withdrawal is sent to the Registrar of the college , 
not later than August 15 preceding the date of opening. Stu- i 
dents are given credit for the $10.00 on the session's expenses 
and it is not, thereby, an additional charge. 

Terms of Payment 

All fees are due and payable at the beginning of each 
semester. If needed, special arrangements may be made with 
the business office, but under no circumstances will any student 
be allowed to pay less than one month in advance. 

Payments must be made promptly on the due date, as stated, 
without further notice. 

All checks should be made payable to William Carey Col- 
lege. Exchange will be charged on all checks that are not on the 
par list of local banks. 

All correspondence relating to financial matters should be 
directed to the Business Manager of the college. 

No student will be permitted to take his mid-year or final 
examinations until all expenses for that semester have been 
paid. 

No student will be granted a transcript of record or diploma 
or honorable dismissal until all expenses for that semester have 
been paid. 

Since William Carey College charges students the lowest 
amount possible consistent with services rendered and quality 
of program offered, no reduction or rebate of fees or residence 
charges can be made. No refund on either tuition or fees can be 
made on account of withdrawal after ten days from the beginning 
of either semester, except in case where illness makes withdraw- 
al necessary and when advised by the college physician. In such 
case, the proportionate part of charges will be refunded. No de- 
duction is made for temporary absences. 

Bookstore and Supplies 

The college maintains a bookstore, through which books, 
stationery, ink, and other supplies are furnished. Students should 
come with money for these items since in no case can they be 
charged. 

Scholarships and Opportunities for Self -Help 

The college is able to offer a number of scholarships to stu- 
dents of high scholastic rating. Individuals and religious groups 
from time to time make grants for scholarship purposes, and 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 123 

friends of the college interested in Religious Education under- 
write a few scholarships for special types of students. 

Sons and daughters of active ministers of the gospel are 
charged only $60.00 for literary tuition during the regular ses- 
sion. 

The "S. E. Lawrence Scholarship Fund," an annual grant, 
is given by Mr. S. E. Lawrence of Marion County. The scholar- 
ships are granted to mission volunteer students from Marion 
County. If none offers from Marion County, the college has the 
option of placing the scholarships on students of like promise and 
need from other localities. 

The Jesse H. Jones and Mary Gibbs Jones Scholarships. In 
1956 the Houston Endowment, Incorporated, a philanthropy en- 
dowed by Mr. and Mrs. Jesse H. Jones, gave to the college a 
grant of $5,000.00 One thousand dollars is available each year 
for five years, for scholarships. No recipient is to receive less 
than $200.00 or more than $500.00 per year. The scholarships 
for boys are known as the Jesse H. Jones Scholarship and the 
scholarships for girls as the Mary Gibbs Jones Scholarships in 
honor of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse H. Jones. Applications are to be 
make to the college scholarship committee which has "jurisdic- 
tion". 

The R. B. Thomas Scholarship Endowment of $10,000 has 
been set up by Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Thomas of Wiggins, Mississippi, 
to assist students who are training for full-time religious work, 
or other students of outstanding quality who might be selected 
by the committee in charge of appropriations of scholarship en- 
dowment. 

Temple Baptist Church Scholarship, a $50.00 Missionary 
Training Scholarship, is offered by the Temple Baptist Church, 
Hattiesburg, for a mission volunteer. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Ross Scholarship. Mr. and Mrs. R. M. 
Ross give annually one scholarship in the amount of $250.00 as a 
memorial to Mrs. Lena Sanders, the mother of Mrs. Ross. This 
scholarship is limited to a student of Attala County, the home 
county of Mrs. Sanders. 

Pat O'Mara Loan Fund. Mr. and Mrs. C. R. O'Mara and 
their daughter Nell O'Mara Brown give one loan scholarship in 
the amount of $200 as a memorial to Miss Pat O'Mara, their 
daughter. This loan is available to a senior only. 

The Board of Ministerial Education of the Mississippi Bap- 
tist Convention offers financial assistance to ministerial students. 

Anyone desiring to apply for any one of the scholarships 
above should write directly to the president of the college for in- 
structions. 



124 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



The college offers a limited number of work assistance oppor- 
tunities to such as find it necessary to earn a part of their college 
expenses. Student help serves the dining hall tables or acts as 
library assistants, office assistants, etc. 

Those needing such help should apply directly to the presi- 
dent of the college. Help cannot be given to all, but as far as the 
college has such opportunities these positions may be applied 
for. 

Veteran*s Administration 

William Carey College is approved by the Veteran's Adminis- 
tration for veterans under Public Law 346, 550 and 16. 

Students coming under the G. I. "Bill of Rights" and entitled 
to benefits thereof come under the administrative office of the 
school. Here arrangements will be made for the course of study 
which a student wishes to pursue and for all related matters. 



The Register 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 127 

ADMINISTRATION 

IRVING E. ROUSE, Ph.D President* 

J. RALPH NOONKESTER, Th.D. Dean** 

MRS. J. RALPH NOONKESTER, B.S.M Registrar 

S. M. WHITE Director of Public Relations 

J. D. SIMS ...Financial Secretary 

MRS. IRVING E. ROUSE Dean of Women* 

ANDREW M. TATE, Ph.D Dean of Men 

T. E. ROSS, M.D College Physician 

MISS FLORENCE LAMBERT College Nurse 

MRS. ANDREW M. TATE Boys' Dormitory Hostess 

MRS. W. E. STEWART Johnson Hall Hostess 

MRS. HETTYE BARBER ROGERS Ross Hall Hostess 

MRS. PEARL McKINNON Manager of Bookstore and Grill 

MRS. MAUDE HEDRICK Dietitian 

MISS JEWEL HANNAH, M.R.E B.S.U. Secretary 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

MR. BRUCE AULTMAN Chairman 

REV. T. R. McKIBBENS Vice-Chalrman 

Term Expires 1956 

REV. T. R. McKIBBENS Laurel, Miss. 

MR. R. B. THOMAS Wiggins, Miss. 

MR. PURSER HEWITT Jackson, Miss. 

REV. W. A. GREENE Roxie, Miss. 

MR. WALTER BEARD Tralake, Miss. 

Term Expires 1957 

MR. BRUCE AULTMAN Hattiesburg, Miss. 

MR. BARNEY WHITFIELD Picayune, Miss. 

REV. J. D. AYCOCK Gulfport, Miss. 

DR. E. W. GREEN Hattiesburg, Miss. 

MR. CARMAN C. SHARPE Clarksdale, Miss. 

Term Expires 1958 

DR. W. L. STAGG Moss Point, Miss. 

MR. CRAWFORD LIPSEY Brookhaven, Miss. 

MR. W. A. CLINTON Hattiesburg, Miss. 

DR. T. E. ROSS Hattiesburg, Miss. 



#» 



Resigned effective Jiily 1, 1956. 
Elected President July 28, 1956. 



128 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

THE FACULTY 

1954 - 1955 

John Lynn Bartlow, M.M.E., Violin, Band and Instrumental Music 
B.M.E., Murray State College, Kentucky; M.M.E., University of Kentucky. 

Theodore F. Boushy, PH.D., History and Social Science 

B.A., Oklahoma Baptist University; M.A., University of Oklahoma; B.D., 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma; 
Graduate Study at West Kentucky Teachers College, Indiana University. 

Charles R. Calkins, M.A., Piano and Theory 

B.A., Birmingham-Southern; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; 
B.M., Birmingham Conservatory of Music; M.M., Birmingham Conservatory 
of Music. 

JxjDsoN Chastain, PH.D., Education and Psychology 

B.A., Mississippi College; M.A., Mississippi Southern College; Th.M., Ph.D., 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Alma Scott Chinigo, M.A., Mathematics and Physics 
B.A., Hunter College; M.A., University of Texas. 

Mary Beth Craft, M.A., English and Spanish 

B.A., Mississippi Southern College; M.A., University of Alabama 

George Robert Cribb, M.A,, Piano, Theory and Music Education 

B.A., Wake Forest College; M.A., Columbia University; Residence require- 
ment completed for doctorate degree, Columbia University; Special study at 
School of Sacred Music, Union Theological Seminary. 

L. C. Devall, Jr., M. A., Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and 
Coach 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College; M.A., University of Mississippi; Advanced 
study. University of Mississippi. 

Fay T. Eubanks, M.A., French and Spanish 

B.A., Mississippi State College for Women; M.A., University of Mississippi. 

Donald George, PH.D., Speech 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

Jewel Hannah, M.S., M.R.E., Business Education and Mathematics 
B.S., Arkansas State College; M.S., University of Termessee; M.R.E., South- 
western Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Willie Dee Hearst, M.S., Biology and Chemistry 

B.S., Whitworth College; B.A., William Carey College; M.S., Tulane Uni- 
versity. 

George Miley Jenkins, Th.D., Religion 

B.A., Mississippi College; B.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Th.M., 
Th.D., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminar^'. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 129 

Ben Sigel Johnson, M.A. Theory and Voice 

A.B., University of Missouri; M.A., Columbia University; Graduate study at 
Julliard School of Music, Union Theological Seminary School of Sacred 
Music, Columbia University. 

Julia O. Loper, M.A., Business Education and English 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College; M.A., University of Mississippi; Graduate 
work at Mississippi State College, Mississippi Southern College and Louisiana 
State University. 

Jack Lawrence Lyall, Ed.D., Choir, Music Education, Voice 

B.F.A., Oklahoma A. & M.; M.A., Ed.D., Columbia University. 

Evelyn McClure, M.S., Art, Home Economics 

B.S., Mississippi Southern College; M.S., University of Termessee. 

Helen Thompson McWhorter, B.M,, Organ, Piano, Theory 

B.M., College of Music of Cincinnati, Graduate work at Louisiana State 
University. 

Wiley J, Moody, M.A., Chemistry 

B.A., Mississippi State College, M.A., Emory University. 

J. Ralph Noonkester, Th.D., Religion and Philosophy 

B.A., University of Richmond; Th.M., Th.D., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary. 

Linwood E. Orange, Ph.D., English 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Duke University. 

Helen Osborne, M.A., Health, Physical Education and Recreation 
B.A., Mary Hardin Baylor College; M.A., Texas State College for Women. 

Ruth Randle, B.S., in Library Science, Librarian 

B.A., Blue Mountain College; B.S., George Peabody College. 

Clarice M. Robinson, Ed.D., Economics and Business Adm^inistration 
B.A., M.A., Ed.D., Indiana University. 

Irvin E. Rouse, Ph.D., Religion and Philosophy 

B.S., Mississippi College, Th.M., Ph.D., Southern Baptist Theological Semi- 
nary. One year special study at the University of Louisville. 

B. Frank Smith, Ph.D., History 

B.A., Louisiana College; Th.M., Ph.D., Southern Baptist Theological Semi- 
nary; M.A., Mississippi Southern College; Graduate study at Louisiana State 
University, George Peabody College. 

Gertrude B. Smith, B.A., Biology Laboratory Assistant 

B.A., William Carey College. 

David C. Yang, M.A., Elementary Education 

B.A., Louisiana College; M.A., Florida State Universitj'. 



130 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 



Admission 

DR. I. E. ROUSE 
MRS. I. E. ROUSE 

Curriculum 

DR. RALPH NOONKESTER 
DR. CLARICE M. ROBINSON 
DR. JUDSON CHASTAIN 
DR. JACK LYALL 

Library 

DR. LINWOOD ORANGE 
MISS RUTH RANDLE 
DR. CLARICE M. ROBINSON 
DR. JUDSON CHASTAIN 

Chapel 

DR. RALPH NOONKESTER 
DR. B. FRANK SMITH 

Student Publications 

DR. RALPH NOONKESTER 

Student Government 
MRS. I. E. ROUSE 

Religious Activities 

DR. RALPH NOONKESTER 
DR. GEORGE JENKINS 

Calendar 

DR. RALPH NOONKESTER 
DR. JACK LYALL 
MR. L. C. DeVALL 

Scholarship 

DR. RALPH NOONKESTER 
DR. THEODORE BOUSHY 
MISS WILLIE D. HEARST 



DR. RALPH NOONKESTER 
MRS. RALPH NOONKESTER 

Dr. LINWOOD ORANGE 
MISS WILLIE D. HEARST 
DR. THEODORE BOUSHY 



DR. JACK LYALL 
MISS WILLIE D. HEARST 
DR. RALPH NOONKESTER 
DR. THEODORE BOUSHY 



MR. BEN S. JOHNSON 
DR. JACK LYALL 

MRS. O. B. LOPER 

DR. A. M. TATE 



MISS JEWEL HANNAH 
DR. THEODORE BOUSHY 



MRS. I. E. ROUSE 

MR. J. D. SIMS 

MRS. H. M. CRAFT, JR. 

DR. CLARICE M. ROBINSON 
MR. BEN S. JOHNSON 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



131 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS, 1955-56 

EDUARDO AGUILAR -- 

JOSE AGUILAR 

ROBERT ALEXANDER 

SUE ALLDREDGE . -- 

LOUISE ALLEN 

LEWIS ALLRED 

FRANCES ARLEDGE 

CHARLES ARNOLD 

GWENDOLYN AYCOCK 

KENNETH BALL 

BOBBY BANNA 



RUTH BARRETT 

LOUISE BASS 

NORMA BAXTER 

CHARLES BEARD 

DEW ANNA BENSON 

BOBBIE BLACK 

LUIS BOLANOS 

NELL BOOKER 

J. R. BOUTWELL 

NANCY BOWMAN 

BETTY BOYETT 

LENNIE INEZ BRASWELL 

EDNA BRIDGES 

MARY NELL BRIDGES 

JANE BRIGANCE 
GEORGE W. BROOKS 
LEWIS BROOKS 



...El Salvador, C. A. 
._E1 Salvador, C. A. 

West, Miss. 

Mobile, Ala. 

Orange, Tex. 

Laurel, Miss. 

...Bay Springs, Miss. 

Natchez, Miss. 

Gtilfport, Miss. 

Leakesville, Miss. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Colmnbia, Miss. 



JEWEL COX BROWN 

MARVIN BROWN 

KATIE RUTH BRUMFIELD .... 

BILLY J. BRYANT 

VICTOR BUCAN __.... 

GERALD BUCHANAN 

RICHARD BUCKLEY „_ 

GEORGE BUFORD 

MARY BULLOCK 

GLADYCE BUSH 

BILL CAIN 

LUCILE CAMPBELL 

FRANCES CARGILE 

JOE CARMICHAEL 

BARBARA J. CARPENTER 

ROSE MARY CARRIERE 

CARLOS CASTILLO 

EVON CLARK 

JOYCE CLINTON 



...Moss Point, Miss. 

Waynesboro, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Pascagoula, Miss. 

El Salvador, C. A. 

-Norfield, Miss. 

Picayune, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

BUoxi, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Petal, Miss. 

. . Prentiss, Miss. 

-Gloster, Miss. 

._ Hattiesburg, Miss. 

_-Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Magnolia, Miss. 

Columbia, Miss. 

Venezuela, S. A. 

_ ...Hattiesburg, Miss. 

.. ■ ..Picayune, Miss. 

Vicksburg, Miss. 

Jackson, Miss. 

Taylorsville, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Newton, Miss. 

Taylorsville, Miss. 

.Crandall, Miss. 
..Moss Point, Miss. 
Laurel, Miss. 



.El Salvador, C. A. 
Petal, Miss. 



MARGARET ANN CLINTON 

LONA PEARL COCHRAN 

KATHERINE COCKERHAM 

MARY FRANCES COCKERHAM 

CHALMERS COLLINS 

BOBBY CRAFT 

MARTHA SARAH CRANFORD 

CECIL CREEL 

GWEN CREEL . 

ANNETTE CROSBY 

BILL CROSBY 



.JHattiesburg, Miss. 

Laurel, Miss. 

.Waynesboro, Miss. 

Liberty, Miss. 

Liberty, Miss. 

Bude, Miss. 

Petal, Miss. 



JESSE CROWELL 

HOWARD DANIEL CRUM . 

BARRY CRUTCHFIELD 

DON DACUS 



Seminary, Miss 

Brooklyn, Miss. 

Petal, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

...St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Durham, N. C. 

Marshall, Tex. 



132 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



JOHN DALLALIO 

PEGGY DANIELS 

JOHN HENRY DAUGHDRILL 

BONNIE DAVES 

BILLY DAVIS 



HOWARD DAVIS -- 

ED DEAS 

BOBBIE M. DENHAM 

WILLIE D. DENNIS 

JUNE DeVALL 

BARRY DILLARD 

MRS. A. S. DONALD 

LOUIE DOSSETT 

ROBERT C. DOSSETT, Jr. 
G. L. DOUGLAS 



Natchez, Miss. 

Brooklyn, Miss. 

Brooklyn, Miss. 

Itta Bena, Miss. 

—Miami Springs, Fla. 
-Ocean Springs, Miss. 
Purvis, Miss. 



LINDA ANN DRAGULA 

LOUIE JANE DUKES -_. 

BETTYE DUNAGIN 

DORA ANN DUNKLEY ___ 
JAMES EDGAR DUNKLEY 
LARRY ELLIOTT 



TOMMIE CATHERINE ELLIOTT 

JOHN E. ELY 

LARRY EUBANKS 

CARL EVANS 

DON EVANS 

M. L. FALER 

GENE FANT 

BOB FENN 



GENE FERGUSON 

HELEN JOYCE FERRELL 
GARY FLOORE 

KATHRYN FLOORE 

GRAYSON DOYLE FORD 
WILLMON FORDHAM _ 
SHIRLEY FORTENBERRY 

SUE FORTENBERRY 

JACK FOSTER 

DON FOWLER 



Seminary, Miss. 

Walnut Grove, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Meadville, Miss. 

New Hebron, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

New Orleans, La. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Magee, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

_ -Beaumont, Miss. 

Beaumont, Miss. 

Nichols, S. C. 

- Purvis, Miss. 

Lucedale, Miss. 

Sumrall, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Chickasaw, Ala. 

Collins, Miss. 

Laurel, Miss. 

Summit, Mi.ss. 

Roanoke, Va. 

Brookhaven, Miss. 

Pascagoula, Miss. 

Lucedale, Miss. 



WOODYE FREELAND _ 

BILLIE FREEMAN 

BOBBIE FREEMAN 

ADELAIDE FULLILOVE 

CARLOS GARCIA 

JERRY GARDNER 

JERRY GARVIN 

IRIS GATEWOOD 

ROBERT GAVIN 



Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Picayune, Miss. 

— Foxworth, Miss. 

Columbia, Miss. 

Natchez, Miss. 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Lucedale, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 



ALICE GEBHART 

EUNICE JOAN GEIGER 

GEORGE GILBERT 

JACK O'NEIL GILES 

DANNIE JEAN GILL 

LOUIS GODWIN 

HUGO GONZALEZ 

BOBBY GRAY 

DAVID RICHARD GREER ... 

WILLIE GRIMSLEY 

MAXINE GRISSETT - -. 



PATSY MORRELL GRUBBS 

KENNETH HAAG 

OLGA ANN HAGLER - 

AUDREY K. HALL _ 



Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Venezuela, C. A. 

_ Moss Point, Miss. 

-Bossier City, La. 

_ Collins, Miss. 

Ovett, Miss. 

Foley, Ala. 

-Lucedale, Miss. 

Shelbyville, Miss. 

, -Doleville, Miss. 

Seminary, Miss. 

Pensacola, Fla. 

Nicaragua 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

Sumrall, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Taylorsville, Miss. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



133 



ELLEN HALL 

THOMAS HALL 

VIOLET HALL _ 

JACKIE HAMILTON 

WILMA JOYCE HANNAFORD 

EDWIN HARPER 

LUCY HARRELL 

BOBBY HARRIS 

ANN HART 

LINDA HARTFIELD 

BEVERLY JANE HARTSFIELD 

JAMES HATHORN 

MARY LOU HATHORN 

FRANCES HATTEN 

WAYNE HEMBREE 

LYNDA SUE HENDERSON 

JO ANN HENSON 



Poplarville, Miss. 

Foxworth, Miss. 

Foxworth, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Columbia, Miss. 

.Laurel, Miss. 

-.Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Jackson, Miss. 

Picayune, Miss. 

_Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Laurel, Miss. 

Bassfield, Miss. 

Bassfield, Miss. 

.-Hattiesburg, Miss. 

McLain, Miss. 

Richton, Miss. 

Wagar, Ala. 



WILLIAM WADE HENSON 

GEORGIA L. HERRIN - _ 

NELL HERRIN 

JULIA ANN HICKS 

ROGER T. HODGES 

JEANETTE HOGAN 

SUE HOLLAND 

JOE HOLLIMAN 

IRVIN HOLSTON 

ETHEL HORN 



Wagar, Ala. 

Collins, Miss. 

Collins, Miss. 

LeakesvUle, Miss. 

Baton Rouge, La. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Lucedale, Miss. 



HARRY T. HOWARD 

CLARA MAE HOWARD 

LEONARD NATHAN HOWARD 
EARL HUBLEY 



DORCAS HUDGINS 

FLORENCE HUGHES ._- 
ALFRED COOK HURST ._ 

FRED HURST 

LOIS B. HURST 

MILDRED HUST 

BILLIE INGRAM 

PAUL DANIEL IRBY 

JOAN ISHEE 

EUGENE JAMES 

MARY RUTH JEFFERSON 

LUTHER JERNIGAN 

ESSIE JOHNSON 

H. E. JOHNSON 

RUSSELL JOHNSON 

CHARLOTTE JONES 

EDNA EARLE JONES 

JEANETTE JONES 

HUGH L. JUDGE 

JEAN JUDGE 

JEAN KELLY 



-HattiesbTirg, Miss. 

Purvis, Miss. 

Prentiss, Miss. 

_Moss Point, Miss. 

Pulaski, Miss. 

Pulaski, Miss. 

_New Orleans, La. 

SalHs, Miss. 

Sanford, Miss. 

Brooklyn, Miss. 

Brooklyn, Miss. 

Brooklyn, Miss. 

..Hattiesburg, Miss. 
..West Monroe, La. 

State Line, Miss. 

-.Taylorsville, Miss. 
..Brighton, Ala. 
-Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Pensacola, Fla. 

Ellisville, Miss. 



ROBERT O. KELLY 
ROBERT KIMBALL 

BETTY KING 

JAMES KING 

RUTH KIRKLAND . 
DONICE KNIGHT .. 



Colvunbia, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

State Line, Miss. 

Laurel, Miss. 

— —-Memphis, Tenn. 

Memphis, Tenn. 

-Hattiebsurg, Miss. 

, Itta Bena, Miss. 

Houma, La. 



DONALD E. LADNER 

FRANCES LADNER 

HERSHELL LADNER 

JOHN VERNON LADNER 
MARY HILDA LANE 



TaylorsvUle, Miss. 

___Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Poplarville, Miss. 

Laurel, Miss. 

Gulfport, Miss. 

Gulfport, Miss. 

Poplarville, Miss. 

-Pass Christian, Miss. 
New Hebron, Miss. 



134 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



SAMUEL JOSEPH LANGHAM 

JOSEPH K. LARRIMORE 

BETTY JANE LAWLER 

JIMMY LAWRENCE 

BETTY BURGE LEE 

SYLVIA LEE - 



CHARLES D. LEWIS 

GEORGE G. LOBO 

MARY ANN LOFTIN 

GWENDOLYN MARIE LORD 

JO S. LOTT 

THOMAS WESLEY LOTT 



Loxley, Ala. 

Lucedale, Miss. 

Lumberton, Miss. 

Lumberton, Miss. 

Carriere, Miss. 

Ashland City, Tenn. 

Lawrenceburg, Tenn. 

Columbia, Miss. 

Petal, Miss . 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Purvis, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 



BARABARA LOUSTALOT Hattiesburg, Miss. 

LEON DENNIS LUCKEY Beaumont, Tex. 

CAROL L. LUELLEN .Bogalusa, La. 

MARIANNE LYALL Hattiesburg, Miss. 

RICHARD MADDEN Water Valley, Miss. 

BARBARA MALLETT ..Hattiesburg, Miss. 

JAMES J. MANNING ...Pritchard, Ala. 

GENE M APP Hattiesburg, Miss. 

DURWOOD MARTIN Jackson, Miss. 

COMMIE MASSEY Hattiesburg, Miss. 

MARCIA MATASOL El Salvador, C. A. 

ANNE MAYFIELD Taylorsville, Miss. 

CAROLYN McBRIDE ....Mobile, Ala. 

DONNIS McCANN Lumberton, Miss. 

HARVIE B. McCLURE Jonesville, La. 

JOE McCOOL -. ...Kreole, Miss. 

LYNETTE McDONALD Hattiesburg, Miss. 

CAROLYN McGAHAGIN ..- ..Tibbie, Ala. 

MAVIS McGEE ...Newton, Miss. 

BOBBY McGEHEE .- McComb, Miss. 



NANCY McGOWEN 

JOHN W. McGREW 

HAZEL C. McINNIS _____ 
BERNICE McINTOSH _ 
CAROLYN McINTOSH .._ 

HELEN McINTOSH 

NANCY McINTOSH 

DOROTHY McKENZIE __ 

ELMO McLAURIN 

ARNOLD McLIN 



..Hattiesburg, Miss. 
-.Heidelberg, Miss. 
.-Hattiesburg, Miss. 
...Leakesville, Miss. 



VIRGINIA MIDDLETON 
B. C. MILES 

JEANNE MILLER ..___.. 

DAVID MILLICAN 

MALCOLM MILLS 

MAXINE MILLS 

ZELLA WAYNE MILLS 

ARCHIE MITCHELL 

BETTY MITCHELL 

BILL MITCHELL 



IDA JOYCE MOONEY...... 

HOWARD MOORE 

LLOYD MOORE 

PAUL B. MOORE 

DUAINE MORGAN 

LOUIE SEALE MORGAN 

BILLY MOSELEY 

ELZIE MOSS . 



Leakesville, Miss. 

..Starkville, Miss. 

Leakesville, Miss. 

...Columbia, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

West Monroe, La. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Dallas, Tex. 

Petal, Miss. 

Chickasaw, Ala. 

Shubuta, Miss. 

Shubuta, Miss. 

Waynesboro, Miss. 

Tylerown, Miss. 

PoplarvUle, Miss. 

Poplarville, Miss. 

Collins, Miss. 

Moselle, Miss. 

Canton, Miss. 

Purvis, Miss. 

Toomsuba, Miss. 

Meridian, Miss. 

Chester, Pa. 



BOBBIE NELL MOULDER 

KEITH MUNYAN 

SIDNEY MURPHY 



Laurel, Miss. 

-Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Jackson, Ohio 

..Hattiesburg, Miss. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



135 



MRS. GUY MYERS 

HOYTE NELSON 

ARLIS NICHOLS 

ANNIE LEE NIELSEN 
DORIS NISHIKUNI - 

MARIA NOVOA 

EVIO DE OLIVEIRA .. 

CAMIL ONGAIS 

CLIFTON PADGETT _ 
J. FORD PARKER — - 

BILL PAYNE 

LEE CAROL PAYNE . 
BETTY JEAN PEAVY 
GLENN PERKINS 



CARROLL PETERSON ... 

JUNE PETTUS 

MYRNA PICKETT 

ELVIS PIGOTT 

MARY JO PITTINGER _ 
TOM POE 



New Hebron, Miss. 

Monticello, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Colombia, S. A. 

El Salvador, C. A. 

Rio, Brazil 

Olaa, Hawaii 

Laurel, Miss. 

Meridian, Miss. 

Memphis, Tenn. 

Lumberton, Miss. 

Columbia, Miss. 

Picayune, Miss. 

...Hattiesburg, Miss. 

_..Pascagoula, Miss. 



WILLIAM PONDER — 
KATIE POPE 



MARGARET ELIZABETH POPE 

DIANE POSEY 

HANDLE POSS 

DORIS POWE 

BOBBYE L. PRUSSING ...._ 

NANCY PUTMAN 



RUBIN N. QUIDLEY 

JOSEPH W. RATCLIFF 

DARLEEN RENICK 

INEZ RICHARDS 

CLYDE F. RISEN 

CHESTER ROBERTS 

GAYLE ROBERTS 

JIMMY C. ROBERTSON 

C. R. ROBINSON ._ 

NORMA JEAN ROGERS 

PRENTISS ROY 

AUDELLE V. RUSS -... 



AMALIA SALINAS 

EDNA SANFORD 

WILLENE SANFORD 

MAURICIO SASSO 

SUE SEAL 

FAYE SELLERS 

MARY LOU SELLERS 

MATTIE SELLERS 

PEGGY SELLERS 

DARRYL SHELTON 

CARL SHEPHERD 

ELIZABETH SHERRILL 

GEORGE SHERRILL 



College Park, Ga. 

McComb, Miss. 

Pascagoula, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

_.. Beaumont, Miss. 

Leakesville, Miss. 

Chicora, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Itta Bena, Miss. 

Buckatvmna, Miss. 

Richton, Miss. 

Pascagoula, Miss. 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Baton Rouge, Miss. 

Perkinston, Miss. 

Laurel, Miss. 

Mobile, Ala. 

Mt. Olive, Miss. 

McLain, Miss. 

Gloster, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

_._ Stanton, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

El Salvador, C. A. 

Seminary, Miss. 

Seminary, Miss. 

.El Salvador, C. A. 

Brooklyn, Miis. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Petal, Miss. 



RACHELLE SHETTER 

BILLY HAROLD SMITH 

FAYE JEANINE SMITH 



GLORIA NELL SMITH 

HELEN SMITH 

JEFFIE G. SMITH 

LA VERNE SMITH 



MARY GAYLE SMITH 

MARY LOU SMITH _.. 
MERITA SMITH 



...Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

CoUinsville, Miss. 

Piave, Miss. 

Leakesville, Miss. 

Franklinton, La. 

Carson, Miss . 

Booneville, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Booneville, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 



136 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



NALTY SMITH 

OTTIS ROBERT SMITH 
PATSY RUTH SMITH __ 
DON SOILEAU 



BONITA SPENCE 

LA VERNE STEEDLEY _ 
ERNEST D. STEELMAN 
LUTHER W. STEPHENS 
AMY BETH STERLING . 
SIDNEY M. STEVERSON . 
DON STEWART 



MONA D. STEWART 

WAYNE STOCKSTILL 

C. H. STONE 



MARTHA ALLEN STORY _ 
DORIS SULLIVAN .— 



KENNETH IRVIN SUMRALL 

NEVA JEAN TAYLOR 

MARCIA THIGPEN 

JANE THOMAS 

LOUISE THOMAS 

MRS. W. C. THOMPSON 

RODOLFO TREJO 

VERA TRUSSELL 

SHIRLEY TUCKER 

BOBBY TURNAGE 

LLOYD TURNER 

WALTER TURNER 

LOZA UPSHAW 

LAURA VILLALOBOS 
CLAUDE E. WALKER 

DAVID WALKER . 

JAMES WALLACE ..... 



BETTY RUTH WALLEY 

GENE WALLEY 

MELONEE WALLEY 



ROBERTA NAN WALTMAN 

ALBERTA WARD 

ERLINE WARD . 

GLORIA WARD 

CARLA WARE 

RAY WATSON 

GLYNN WATTS 



JEANETTE WATTS 

LA VERNE WEATHERFORD 

ANNIE RUTH WEDGEWORTH 

GEORGE N. WELCH 

MRS. MATTIE WELLS 

HENRY ROBERT WEST 

JULIAN WEST 



WALLACE WHATLEY 

FARRALL WHEAT 

EDITH FAYE WHITE .. 

EDITH WHITLEY 

ROBERT WHITTEN 

JAMES CARLTON WIGLEY __. 
MORRIS DEVON WILLIAMS 

PAUL WILLIAMS 

MARTHA K. WINDHAM 

WILLIAM WOMACK 

GRADY WOODWARD 

JUNE WRIGHT ._ 

VIRGINIA WU 



Meridian, Miss. 

Tylertown, Miss. 

Poplarville, Miss. 

New Orleans, La. 

_ — _ Foxwoilii, Miss. 

Bay Minette, Ala. 

StimraU, Miss. 

Itta Bena, Miss. 

Jackson, Miss. 

Brandon, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Picayune, Miss. 

Gulfport, Miss. 

Laiirel, Miss. 

Ocean Springs, Miss. 

Sumrall, Miss. 

Laurel, Miss. 

Mobile, Ala. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

New Hebron, Miss. 

El Salvador, C. A. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Raymond, Miss. 

_.._ . Hattiesburg, Miss. 

-.Atlanta, Ga. 

Waynesboro, Miss. 

Costa Rico, C. A. 

. Collins, Miss. 

._ Carriere, Miss. 

Coliunbia, Miss. 

State Line, Miss. 

Mobile, Ala. 

. Richton, Miss. 

. __Hattiesburg, Miss. 

. Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Moss Point, Miss. 

Wiggins, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Mobile, Ala. 

Picayune, Miss. 

. Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Mi.ss 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

. Morgan City, Miss. 

New Hebron, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Waynesboro, Miss. 

Pascagoula, Miss . 

Summit, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Brandon, Miss. 

Oak Grove, La. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Lucedale, Miss . 

Itta Bena, Miss. 

. Taylorsville, Miss. 

Fredericktown, Mo. 

._ Lucedale, Miss. 

. Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Fort Worth, Tex. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



137 



1955 Summer Session 



A. N. ABERCROMBIE 
LOUISE ALLEN 



GRACE COOK ALLEN 
LAWRENCE ALLEN _ 

J. B. BLACKLIDGE 

NELL BOOKER 

GEORGE BOUNDS 

RICHARD BRELAND . 

JAMES M. BROOME 

JEWEL COX BROWN 

MARVIN BROWN 

GERALD BUCHANAN 
GLADYCE BUSH 



MARY CATHERINE BYRD 
BILL CAIN 



ROSE MARY CARRIERE 

LUCILE CAMPBELL 

ETHEL CARTER 

CARLOS CASTILLO 

ADLEA CHAPMAN 

JOYCE CLINTON 

BURL COOLEY 

GWEN CREEL 

BILL CROSBY 



JOHN DALLALIO 
PEGGY DANIELS 
EDWARD N. DAVIS _ 
BOBBIE M. DENHAM 

G. L. DOUGLAS 

LARRY ELLIOTT 



Collins, Miss. 

Orange, Tex. 

Orange, Tex. 

. McComb, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

. Norfield, Miss. 

Smnrall, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Petal, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesbvurg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

. Taylorsville, Miss. 

Leakesville, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Laurel, Miss. 

Newton, Miss. 

Pascagoula, Miss. 

El Salvador, C. A. 

Taylorsville, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Petal, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Natchez, Miss. 

... Brooklyn, Miss. 

Sumrall, Miss. 



MIREYA ENTRALGO 

HELEN JOYCE FERRELL 
JACK FOSTER 

BILLIE FREEMAN 

CARLOS GARCIA 

IRIS GATEWOOD 



JACKIE HAMILTON 

WILMA JOYCE HANNAFORD 

BOBBY HARRIS 

ANN HART 



TOMMY HARVEY 

WAYNE HEMBREE 

MARILYN HOLCOMB . 

JOE HOLLIMAN 

PATRICIA HOLLIMAN 
ETHEL HORN 



HARRY HOWARD 

CLARA MAE HOWARD 

EARL HUBLEY 

FRED HURST 

BILLIE INGRAM 

JOYCE JOHNSON 

JAMES KING 

RUTH KIRKLAND 
DONALD E. LADNER _ 

BETTY BURGE LEE 

ERNEST LEON __. 

HECTOR LEON 

BARBARA LOUSTALOT . 

CAROL L. LUELLEN 

MARIANNE LYALL 



Seminary, Miss. 

New Orleans, La. 

Nichols, S. C. 

. Venezuela, C. A. 

Brookhaven, Miss. 

Natchez, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Venezuela, C. A. 

Collins, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Columbia, Miss. 

Jackson, Miss. 

Picayune, Miss. 

Carson, Miss. 

McLain, Miss. 

__-^ Sanford, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

. . Prentiss, Miss. 

Moss Point, Miss. 

Pulaski, Miss. 

New Orleans, I..a. 

Brooklyn, Miss. 

. West Monroe, La. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Poplarville, Miss. 

. Gulfport, Miss. 

Carriere, Miss. 

._ Nicaragua, C. A. 

Nicaragua, C. A. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Bogalusa, La. 

Hatiesburg, Miss. 



138 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



DURWOOD MARTIN 
HASKEL MATHIS _._ 
DONNIS McCANN 



-Jackson, Miss. 
..Collins, Miss. 



. Lumberton, Miss. 

CAROLYN McGAHAGIN _ Tibbie, Ala. 

NANCY McINTOSH — _ LeakesviUe, Miss. 

ROBERT McNAMEE Hattiesburg, Miss. 

DAISY MOORE Purvis, Miss 

PAUL MOORE Purvis, Miss. 

DUAINE MORGAN Toomsuba, Miss. 

LOUI SEALE MORGAN Meridian, Miss. 

SIDNEY MURPHY Hattiesburg, Miss. 

MRS. GUY MYERS New Hebron, Miss. 

ORA E. NELSON Jackson, Miss. 

ARLIS NICHOLS Hattiesburg, Miss. 

CLIFTON PADGETT Laurel, Miss. 



WILLIAM G. PAGE 

BONNIE JEAN PARKER _ 

JAMES E. PARKER 

LEO E. PAVLU 

GLENN PERKINS 

CARROLL PETERSON 

ELVIS PIGOTT 

GABRIELA PONCE 

ROBERT POWELL 

SARAH ROUSE 



Hot Springs, Ark. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

- Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Picayune, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

McComb, Miss. 

Mexico 



AMALIA SALINAS 

EDNA SANFORD 

WILLENE SANFORD 

SUE SEAL 

RACHELLE SHETTER 

LINDA SIMS 

OTTIS ROBERT SMITH 

JOHNNY SPENCER 

ERNEST D. STEELMAN 

DOTTY STEPHENS 

SIDNEY STEVERSON 

C. H. STONE 

RAY STREBECK 

BOBBY TURNAGE 



Columbia, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

El Salvador, C. A. 

Seminary, Miss. 

Seminary, Miss. 

Brooklyn, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Tylertown, Miss. 

Corinth, Miss. 

Sumrall, Miss. 

Sumrall, Miss. 



Taylorsville, Miss. 

Gulfport, Miss. 

Collins, Miss. 

Raymond, Miss. 

Sandy Hook, Miss. 

Stale Line, Miss. 



NORMA LEE VINCE 

BETTY RUTH WALLEY 

ALBERTA WARD Hattiesburg, Miss. 

ERLINE WARD Moss Point, Miss. 

GLORIA WARD Wiggins, Miss. 

W. J. WARD Collins, Miss. 



WALLACE WHATLEY 

ROBERT WHITTEN 

WILLIAM WOMACK 

RUSSELL WRAY 

VIRGINIA WU 



Pascagoula, Miss. 

Oak Grove, La. 

FredericktowTi, Mo. 

Fredericktown, Mo. 

Ft. Worth, Tex. 



MRS. W. L. YEATMAN _ .....Hattiesburg, Miss. 

ANNIE JUNE YOUNG Hattiesburg, Miss. 

JOHN S. YOUNG _ _. Summitt, Miss. 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 139^ 

COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 
WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

HATTIESBURG, MISSISSIPPI 

Saturday Morning, August 6, 1955 

Ten O'clock 

TATUM COURT 



Prelude, Andante Religioso Thome 

Mrs. Maurice McWhorter 

Processional, Largo from "Xerxes" Handel 

Invocation Dr. I. E. Rouse 

Special Music 

Glorious Is Thy Name Mozart 

As Torrents In Summer Elgar 

Onward Christian Soldiers Sabine 

Concert Choir 
Dr. Jack Lyall, Director 

Address, "Intelligence, Our Moral 

Obligation" Dr. J. Ralph Noonkester 

Conferring of Degrees Dr. I. E. Rouse 

Benediction Dr. J. Ralph Noonkester 

Recessional, March of the Priests Mendelssohn 

Mrs. Maurice McWhorter 

» * « « 

MEMBERS OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL GRADUATING CLASS 

1955 
Bachelor of Arts 

Alice Adlea Chapman Sarah Allman Rouse 

Haskel Mathis Linda Mattox Sims 

Robert Lloyd McNamee Walter Ray Strebeck 

Ora Ezell Nelson Russell Lee Wray 

Bachelor of Science 

Grace Cook Allen Norma Lee Vince 

Lawrence S. Allen W. J. Ward 

William Gordon Page John Sharp Young, Jr. 



140 WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 
COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 

TATUM COURT 

Thursday Evening, May 24, 1956 

Eight O'clock 

Prelude, Lamb of God Bizet 

Mrs. Maurice McWhorter 

Processional, March in G Smart 

Doxology 

Invocation Dr. R. Elmer Nielsen 

Pastor, Immanuel Baptist Church 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi 

Lost in the Night Christiansen 

Hallelujah ( Mount of OHves ) Beethoven 

Concert Choir 

Dr. Jack LyaU, Director 

Robert Harris, Soloist 

Marcia Thigpen, Accompanist 

Announcements and Introduction of Speaker Dr. I. E. Rouse 

Baccalaureate Sermon Dr. W. C. Fields 

Pastor, First Baptist Church 
Yazoo City, Mississippi 

Benediction Rev. Irving M. Prince 

Pastor, Temple Baptist Church 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi 

Recessional, March from "The Occasional Oratorio" Handel 

Mrs. Maurice McWhorter 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 141 

COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 
WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 

TATUM COURT 

Friday Evening, May 25, 1956 

Eight O'clock 

Prelude, Nocturne in E flat Chopin 

Mrs. Maurice McWhorter 

Processional, Pomp and Circumstance Elgar 

Invocation Dr. George Jenkins 

Meditation (Thais) Massenet 

J. Lynn Bartlow, Violinist 
Charles R. Calkins, Accompanist 

Presentation of Speaker Dr. I. E. Rouse 

Address Dr. Chester Swor 

Southwide Youth Speaker 
Jackson, Mississippi 

Presentation of Candidates Dr. J. Ralph Noonkester 

Dean 

Conferring of Degrees Dr. I. E. Rouse 

Benediction Dr. Judson Chastain 

Pastor, Brewer Baptist Church 
Richton, Mississippi 

Recessional, Chorale-Prelude Bach 

Mrs. Maurice McWhorter 



142 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 



MEMBERS OF MAY GRADUATING CLASS 1956 
Bachelor of Arts 



MAMIE NELL BOOKER 
JEWEL COX BROWN 
MARVIN WALLACE BROWN 
KATIE RUTH BRUMFIELD 
WILLIAM HENRY CAIN 

BOBBIE McDonald denham 

DORA ANN DUNKLEY 
OGLA ANN HAGLER 
THOMAS M. HALL 
NYRA SUE HOLLAND 
CLARA MAE HOWARD 
BILLIE IMOGENE INGRAM 



CAROLYN LEOLIN McGAHAGIN 
BILL MITCHELL 
DUAINE MORGAN 
CLIFTON OSBORN PADGETT 
GLORIA NELL SMITH 
JEFFIE GARNER SMITH 
MARY LOUISE SMITH 
ERNEST D. STEELMAN 
WALLACE HESTEL WHATLEY 
EDITH WHITLEY 
ROBERT DAYTON WHITTEN 



Bachelor of Science 



ROBERT CLAYTON ALEXANDER 
GLADYCE KING BUSH 
BILLY JOE CARMICHAEL 
JOYCE CLINTON 
LONA PEARL COCHRAN 
BILLY JOHN CROSBY 
BILLY BURNHAM DAVIS 
BARRY EDWARD DILLARD 
ROBERT CHARLES DOSSETT, JR. 
JACK D. FOSTER 
ROBERT E. GAVIN 
LOUIS MARION GODWIN 
VIOLET NADINE HALL 
WILMA JOYCE HANNAFORD 
ROBERT ORAN HARRIS 
JOE LEWIS HOLLIMAN, JR. 
ETHEL RUTLAND HORN 
EARL O. HUBLEY 
PAUL DANIEL IRBY 
H. E. JOHNSON, JR. 



BETTY BURGE LEE 
RICHARD EVERETT MADDEN 
FORREST E. MAPP 
WILLIAM DURWOOD MARTIN 
DONNIS NELL McCANN 
RACHEL CAROLYN McINTOSH 
ELEANOR BERNICE McINTOSH 
HELEN F. McINTOSH 
LLOYD THURMAN MOORE 
HOWARD G. PERKINS 
THOMAS I. POE 
PATSY RUTH SMITH 
OTTIS R. SMITH, JR. 
DONALD EUGENE SOILEAU 
MONA DAUGHDRILL STEWART 
NEVA JEAN TAYLOR 
BOBBY NEIL TURNAGE 
MELONEE WALLEY 
ALBERTA CATHERINE WARD 



Bachelor of Music 



ELEANOR JANE BRIGANCE 



CHALMERS ALLEN COLLINS, JR. 



BETTY MITCHELL 



WILLIAM CAREY COLLEGE 143 

CALENDAR 

1956-57 

FIRST SEMESTER 

September 6, 7, 8 Faculty Session 

September 7 Dormitories open for Freshmen and Transfer Seudents 

September 8, 10, 11 Tests and Orientation for Freshmen and Transfer Students 

September 11 Registration for Old Students-8:00 A.M. 

September 11 Registration for New Transfer Students— 1:00 P.M. 

September 12 Registration for Freshmen— 8:00 A.M. 

September 13 Classes begin-8:00 A.M. 

November 21-26 Thanksgiving Holidays 

(Begin Noon, 21st) 

December 19-January 2 Christmas HoUdays 

January 2 Classes begin— 8:00 A.M. 

January 21-25 Semester Examinations 

January 25 First Semester Closes 

SECOND SEMESTER 

January 28-29 Registration 

January 30 Classes begin— 8:00 A.M. 

March 27-April 1 Spring Holidays 

(Begin Noon, 27th) 

May 27-31 Final Examinations 

May 30 Baccalaureate Sermon 

May 31 Graduation 

SUMMER SESSION -1957 

June 3- July 6 First Term 

July 8-August 10 Second Term